canon law

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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, many ecclesiastical laws had been made in the Catholic Church's own institutional interests and went beyond its legitimate bounds.
Her most recent book, which examines the problem of ecclesiastical law (tserkovnoe pravo) in the functioning of Russia's state system from the late 18th century until 1917, is the broader of the two in its chronological scope.
See Troianos, Lectures on Ecclesiastical Law, 91-92 and 94; Konidaris, "Legal Status of Minority Churches and Religious Communities in Greece," 172-74; and A.
In examining both the history of the will and that of marriage, Sheehan elucidates the role of the Church in terms of the construction of ecclesiastical law and its influence on common law and societal practice, with particular emphasis on the status of women.
Though the church has to change, it may not change `divine law' (jus divinum) but only ecclesiastical law.
The medieval canonists, in a classic fit of legal double-talk, defined the church as a corporate person whose legal authority resided ultimately in the Catholic people but was exercised by officeholders chosen according to the norms of divine and ecclesiastical law - law that was defined, of course, by the officeholders themselves.
Under both civil and ecclesiastical law, the procurement of a marriage through force or fraud invalidates the marriage and the aggrieved party is entitled to an annulment.
She is a member of the Charity Law Association, Ecclesiastical Law Association and the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners.
The firm has had to move forward and though we don't do maritime or ecclesiastical law we do pretty much everything else.
The church combined Germanic tribal law and Roman civil law into the ecclesiastical law of marriage, still reflected in our modern canon law.
In another new area of expertise, Philip Wills, former in-house legal advisor to the Diocese of Durham, has added ecclesiastical law to the firm's services.