ecchymosis


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ecchymosis

 [ek″ĭ-mo´sis] (pl. ecchymo´ses) (Gr.)
a hemorrhagic spot, larger than a petechia, in the skin or mucous membrane, forming a flat, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch. (See Atlas 2, Part R.) adj., adj ecchymot´ic.

ec·chy·mo·sis

(ek'i-mō'sis),
A purplish patch caused by extravasation of blood into the skin, differing from petechiae only in size (that is, larger than 3 mm diameter).
[G. ekchymōsis, ecchymosis, fr. ek, out, + chymos, juice]

ecchymosis

/ec·chy·mo·sis/ (ek″ĭ-mo´sis) pl. ecchymo´ses   [Gr.] a small hemorrhagic spot in the skin or a mucous membrane, larger than a petechia, forming a nonelevated, rounded, or irregular blue or purplish patch.ecchymot´ic

ecchymosis

(ĕk′ĭ-mō′sĭs)
n.
The passage of blood from ruptured blood vessels into subcutaneous tissue, marked by a purple discoloration of the skin.

ec′chy·mot′ic (-mŏt′ĭk) adj.

ecchymosis

[ek′imō′sis] pl. ecchymoses
Etymology: Gk, ek + chymos, juice
bluish discoloration of an area of skin or mucous membrane caused by the extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissues as a result of trauma to the underlying blood vessels or fragility of the vessel walls. Also called bruise. Compare contusion, petechiae.
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Ecchymosis

ecchymosis

Internal bruising or bleeding

ec·chy·mo·sis

(ek-i-mō'sis)
A purplish patch caused by extravasation of blood into the skin, differing from petechiae only in size (i.e., ecchymoses are larger than 3 mm diameter).
[G. ekchymōsis, ecchymosis, fr. ek, out, + chymos, juice]

ecchymosis

(ĕk-ĭ-mō′sĭs) plural.ecchymoses [″ + ″ + osis, condition]
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TRAUMATIC ECCHYMOSIS
Superficial bleeding under the skin or a mucous membrane; a bruise. See: illustration
ecchymotic (-mŏt′ĭk), adjective

ecchymosis

Bleeding (haemorrhage) or bruising in the skin or a mucous membrane, in the form of small, round spots or purplish discoloration.

Ecchymosis (plural, ecchymoses)

The medical term for a bruise. Ecchymoses may develop around the eyes following a nasal fracture.
Mentioned in: Nasal Trauma

ecchymosis

extravasation of blood into skin, i.e. a bruise

ec·chy·mo·sis

(ek-i-mō'sis)
Purplish patch due to blood extravasation into the skin, differing from petechiae only in size.
[G. ekchymōsis, ecchymosis, fr. ek, out, + chymos, juice]

ecchymosis (ek´imō´sis),

n a discoloration of mucous membranes caused by a diffuse extravasation of blood. See also bruise.

ecchymosis

pl. ecchymoses [Gr.] a hemorrhagic spot, larger than a petechia, in the skin or mucous membrane, forming a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch.
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3 Ecchymosis 11% 19% for (4) 2013 N=26 blepharoptosis blepharoptosis 19% Table 2 Summary of injection techniques, HA filler type, volume, initial duration, requirement for repeat injections or hyaluronidase and complication for patients with restrictive lagophthalmos and eyelid malpositions Indication Journal Product (No.
Conventional methods of osteotomy may require mechanical energy, and prolonged postoperative ecchymosis and edema may occur due to trauma to the nasal mucosa.
Mobility, pain, tenderness, and tooth fracture were the most common injuries of hard tissues; on the other hand, pain and ecchymosis were the most common soft tissue injuries.
However the REEDA (Redness, Edema, Ecchymosis, Discharge and Approximation) scale was significantly lower in the experimental group 5 days after episiotomy (p=0.
The decline in the patient's hematocrit and the presence of ecchymosis about her thigh were the only early signs of her vascular injury.
26) These children typically display linear lap belt ecchymosis across the lower abdomen and/or flank.
On physical examination, a purple ecchymosis with a size of 1x2 cm on the skin of the upper part of the right cheekbone, an ecchymosis with a size of 3x2 cm on the upper part of the left cheekbone extending to the lower part of the eye and nasal root with irregular borders were observed.
12) In situations where sharp ends of the hyoid cause laryngeal lacerations and prevertebral muscle damage symptoms of hemoptysis, subcutaneous emphysema and ecchymosis are commonly noted.
With infiltration patches and plates, followed by inflammation and by areas of painful ecchymosis within the following 24 hours (37)
Early identification of CS involves recognition of characteristic signs, including 'tramline' bruising (distinctive lines suggestive of beating with a sjambok), ecchymosis over large muscle groups, and widespread blunt trauma.
In exam, wrist swelling was generally moderate with subtle deformity and ecchymosis in volar part.