ecchymosis


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ecchymosis

 [ek″ĭ-mo´sis] (pl. ecchymo´ses) (Gr.)
a hemorrhagic spot, larger than a petechia, in the skin or mucous membrane, forming a flat, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch. (See Atlas 2, Part R.) adj., adj ecchymot´ic.

ec·chy·mo·sis

(ek'i-mō'sis),
A purplish patch caused by extravasation of blood into the skin, differing from petechiae only in size (that is, larger than 3 mm diameter).
[G. ekchymōsis, ecchymosis, fr. ek, out, + chymos, juice]

ecchymosis

(ĕk′ĭ-mō′sĭs)
n.
The passage of blood from ruptured blood vessels into subcutaneous tissue, marked by a purple discoloration of the skin.

ec′chy·mot′ic (-mŏt′ĭk) adj.

ecchymosis

Internal bruising or bleeding

ec·chy·mo·sis

(ek-i-mō'sis)
A purplish patch caused by extravasation of blood into the skin, differing from petechiae only in size (i.e., ecchymoses are larger than 3 mm diameter).
[G. ekchymōsis, ecchymosis, fr. ek, out, + chymos, juice]

ecchymosis

(ĕk-ĭ-mō′sĭs) plural.ecchymoses [″ + ″ + osis, condition]
Enlarge picture
TRAUMATIC ECCHYMOSIS
Superficial bleeding under the skin or a mucous membrane; a bruise. See: illustration
ecchymotic (-mŏt′ĭk), adjective

ecchymosis

Bleeding (haemorrhage) or bruising in the skin or a mucous membrane, in the form of small, round spots or purplish discoloration.

Ecchymosis (plural, ecchymoses)

The medical term for a bruise. Ecchymoses may develop around the eyes following a nasal fracture.
Mentioned in: Nasal Trauma

ec·chy·mo·sis

(ek-i-mō'sis)
Purplish patch due to blood extravasation into the skin, differing from petechiae only in size.
[G. ekchymōsis, ecchymosis, fr. ek, out, + chymos, juice]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecchymosis of the scrotum was a common finding but most of the time appeared several hours after the clinical onset of the condition.
1 Miliaria crystallina 353 95.3 2 Scalp ecchymosis 71 7.1 3 Perianal dermatitis 56 5.6 4 Miliaria rubra 24 2.4 5 Caput succedaneum 9 0.9 6 Sclerema neonatorum 1 0.1 Table XIII.
The drain was removed; his voice was normal and there were no ecchymosis. Postoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed a hematoma near the right vocal fold (Figure 1) and paralysis on the right vocal fold; however, the airway was open.
Abbreviations: DF, dengue fever; DHF, dengue hemorrhagic fever; DSS, dengue shock syndrome; (a) From t-test or chi-square test as corresponding; (b) Arithmetic mean (standard deviation); (c) Ascites, edema or pleural effusion; (d) Petechiae, ecchymosis, hematoma or positive tourniquet test; (e) Gingival bleeding, epistaxis, hematuria, abnormal vaginal bleeding, hematemesis or melena.
Her fever increased and cutaneous lesions evolved to hemorrhages and ecchymosis in both hands and feet.
Complications were only mild with reports of ecchymosis in three patients, while five patients had mild blepharoptosis readily reversed with hyaluronidase.
The patient had stiffness of the pectoral muscles, and petechiation and ecchymosis noted around the eyes and beneath the mandible.
Dengue non-hemorrhagic patient were categorized by their symptoms like headache, fever, retro-orbital pain, backache, bone and joint pain, weakness, depression and malaise while dengue hemorrhagic fever patients were with the symptoms of restlessness, acute fever, sweating severe abdominal pain, petechiae, ecchymosis, epistaxis and shock.
Patients usually present with some combination of epistaxis, edema, laceration, instability, crepitation, ecchymosis, and deformity; however, these physical findings may not always be present and are often fading (5).
Examination showed elderly female in altered mental state, lethargic with bilateral upper extremity deformities from rheumatoid arthritis, with dorsum of left hand swollen with ecchymosis. Radial artery pulse was feeble.
Physical examination was notable for a 10 X 15 cm mass of the left chest flank associated with ecchymosis. The patient was also seen to have paradoxical motion of this mass with respiration.