earmark


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earmark

taking a piece out of the edge or center of the ear with a punch as an identification mark. The shape of the mark may be registerable under local legislation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell were the ones who resisted the earmark ban most vigorously.
Congress, for a number of years, insisted on buying new planes, over administration objections, and the earmark moratorium would not prevent that.
When an earmark is approved, the Congressmen or senator who secured it can, if he or she chooses, return to his or her home district or state and meet face to face with the people that earmark is going to help.
McConnell has enjoyed being able to serve as the earmark czar for his home state.
Texas is one of the biggest states, period," Levinthal says, "but also one of the biggest states in term of its military presence, with earmarks oftentimes benefiting defense contractors or defense installations.
Under new reforms, members of Congress posted their earmark requests on their Web sites for the first time this year.
congressional earmark, congressionally directed spending item, and
Along with the AP package, the news cooperative is providing a national database of congressional earmark information that will be available for all AP members to use on their Web sites.
In 2007, for example, Americans United was able to successfully block an earmark put forth by Louisiana Senator David Vitter.
The inspector general estimated each earmark grantee got about six hours of attention that year.
In the wake of recent lobbying scandals, leaders in both chambers of Congress are attempting to control the number of earmarks introduced into bills after conference.