weaning

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weaning

 [wēn´ing]
1. the discontinuing of breastfeeding.
2. the discontinuing of dependency on assisted ventilation.
mechanical ventilatory weaning in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to breathe without the aid of a mechanical ventilator. See also dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response.

wean·ing

(wēn'ing),
1. Transition of the human infant from breast-feeding or bottle nursing and commencement of nourishment with other food.
2. Gradual withdrawal of a patient from dependency on a life-support system or other form of therapy.
3. Gradual elimination of physical or psychological dependence on a harmful or otherwise inappropriate substance or activity.
4. In veterinary medicine, the process of removal of the offspring from the dam; complete housing separation is often combined with removal of nursing support; or of bottled milk as a source of nutrition in those animals already taken off the dam; both processes are preceded by creep feeding.

wean·ing

(wēn'ing)
1. Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food.
2. Gradual withdrawal of a patient from dependence on a life-support system or other form of therapy.

weaning

Substitution of solid foods for milk in an infant's diet.

weaning

the accustoming of a young mammal to a form of nutrition other than its mother's milk.

weaning,

n the period of transition from breast feeding to eating solid foods.

wean·ing

(wēn'ing)
1. Transition of the human infant from breast-feeding or bottle nursing and commencement of nourishment with other food.
2. Gradual withdrawal of a patient from dependency on a life-support system or other form of therapy.
3. Gradual elimination of physical or psychological dependence on a harmful or otherwise inappropriate substance or activity.

weaning

the act of separating the young from the dam that it has been sucking, or receiving a milk diet provided by the dam or from artificial sources.

weaning age
the average age at which groups of lambs, calves or piglets are weaned off milk, which may be provided by the dam or by artificial means. In pastured animals the age is that at which the young animals are judged to be able to survive on their own by grazing, say 4 to 6 months. In intensive farming systems where good quality, well-balanced diets can be fed, and the young kept under close surveillance, early weaning is practiced successfully. Also modern farming methods demand early weaning so that the dams are again available for mating. Dairy calves, sucking pigs and some lambs are now weaned at 2 to 7 days after birth. Under natural conditions more normal weaning ages, though still subject to a great deal of variation are: calves—4 to 6 months; lambs, goat kids—8 to 10 weeks; piglets—30 to 60 days; foals—5 to 6 months; puppies—6 to 8 weeks; kittens—7 to 8 weeks.
early weaning
weaning before the young have begun to take significant amounts of alternative diets, e.g. piglets at 3 weeks of age. Usually because of a shortage of feed for the dam, or because of the need to increase the number of young produced per female per year. Segregated early weaning of pigs is a practice to reduce the transmission of disease from sow to offspring. Piglets are removed from the sow at 10 to 14 days of age and subsequently reared in a separate environment. Medicated early weaning of pigs is similar to segregated early weaning except the sow and litter are medicated with an antimicrobial active against a specific bacteria whose transmission from sow to piglet is being targeted.
weaning weight
the weight of the young at weaning. Used as a target for young food animals raised for commercial purposes and is an expression of the size at which the young are capable of leading an independent existence. In calves, in particular, the age is related to the development of adequate rumen function. Adjusted weaning weight in beef cattle is the weight immediately at weaning adjusted to 205 days of age and to mature dam age equivalence.
References in periodicals archive ?
This makes them feel dispensable in the process helping to increase early weaning.
Very early weaning has immediate negative effect on physiology, performance and behavior of piglets (Salmon et al.
Determinants of early weaning and use of unmodified cow's milk in infants: a systematic review.
The research confirmed that early weaning is profitable.
The report also noted that infant illnesses (diarrhea, malaria and TB), growth problems, and deaths significantly increased after early weaning.
Effect of segregated early weaning on postweaning small intestinal development in pigs.
The potential efficiency gains from early weaning (Krsinich et al.
The practice of exclusive breastfeeding until six months of age is encouraged by the Ministry of Health in Brazil; however, when newborns are premature, the mothers need further encouragement by the neonatal team to prevent early weaning due to these children's greater vulnerability to morbidity and neonatal mortality.
Early weaning has also been to shown to impact the oral cavity.
In sub-Saharan Africa, reduction in HIV infection through breastfeeding requires either artificial feeding or exclusive breastfeeding with early weaning.
Use of formula (unless it is medically indicated) while the baby is in the maternity facility has long been proven by research to be a key factor in poor breast-feeding and early weaning, which should be discouraged in these tight economic times, as the cost of formula is unnecessary.
Sex, age and early weaning were also found to be associated factors for a longer duration of episodes of diarrhea.

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