aggressive periodontitis type 1

(redirected from early onset periodontitis)

aggressive periodontitis type 1

An autosomal dominant condition (OMIM:170650) characterised by severe and protracted gingival infections, leading to tooth loss.

Molecular pathology
Defects in CTSC, which encodes cathepsin C, a ubiquitous lysosomal cysteine proteinase, cause aggressive periodontititis type 1.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS) is a very rare syndrome of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and early onset periodontitis, leading to premature loss of both primary and permanent dentition.
Aggressive periodontitis (juvenile or early onset periodontitis) is characterized by early onset mostly affecting young people and in the absence of significant plaque and calculus and shows a rapid progression of destruction.
Brown, "Early onset periodontitis in the United States of America," Journal of Periodontology, vol.
Suzuki, "Phenotypic assessment of early onset periodontitis in sibships," Journal of Clinical Periodontology, vol.
We confirmed these findings in our previous longitudinal studies in which we followed, for a period of 10 years, patients with early onset periodontitis (EOP, now known as aggressive periodontitis) with changes in periodontal tissues diagnosed between the ages of 17 and 25.
For example, the periodontitis of young subjects, formerly presented as early onset periodontitis or juvenile periodontitis, is currently classified as aggressive periodontitis.
Clinical and laboratory characterization of early onset periodontitis. J Periodontol.
(58.) Palmer RM, Watts TL, Wilson RF.A double-blind trial of tetracycline in the management of early onset periodontitis. J Clin Periodontol.
Association of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphisms with early onset periodontitis in Japanese.
The results of the present study support the earlier studies which show that 50-75% of the attachment of affected teeth in aggressive periodontitis (formerly known as juvenile periodontitis or early onset periodontitis) may be lost in 4-5 years and that the rate of bone loss was about three to four times faster than that in typical
Attachment loss in Moroccan early onset periodontitis patients and infection with the JP2-type of A.
It is typically characterised by hyperkeratosis affecting the palms of the hands and soles of the feet and early onset periodontitis with premature exfoliation of teeth [Johnes and Mason, 1980].

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