eardrum


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eardrum

 [ēr´drum]

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

[TA]
a thin tense membrane forming the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separating it from the external acoustic meatus; it constitutes the boundary between the external and middle ears; it is a trilaminar membrane covered with skin on its external surface, mucosa in its internal surface, is covered on both surfaces with epithelium, and, in the tense part, has an intermediate layer of outer radial and inner circular collagen fibers.

eardrum

(îr′drŭm′)
n.
The thin, semitransparent, oval-shaped membrane that separates the middle ear from the external ear. Also called tympanic membrane, tympanum.

eardrum

Tympanic membrane, see there.

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

(tim-pan'ik mem'brān) [TA]
A thin, tense covering that forms the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separates it from the external acoustic meatus; it constitutes the boundary between the external and middle ear, is covered on both surfaces with epithelium, and in the tense part has an intermediate layer of outer radial and inner circular collagen fibers.
Synonym(s): membrana tympani [TA] , drum membrane, drum, drumhead, eardrum, myringa, myrinx.
[L. membrana tympani]

eardrum

The tympanic membrane that separates the inner end of the external auditory canal (the meatus) from the middle ear. The outer side of the drum is covered with thin skin and to the inner side is attached the malleus, first of the three tiny bones, the auditory ossicles.

eardrum

see TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.

Eardrum

A paper-thin covering stretching across the ear canal that separates the middle and outer ears.
Mentioned in: Hearing Aids

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

(tim-pan'ik mem'brān) [TA]
A thin tense membrane forming the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separating it from the external acoustic meatus.
Synonym(s): eardrum.
[L. membrana tympani]
References in periodicals archive ?
This app works by sending sounds into the ear and measuring how those sound waves change as they bounce off the eardrum.
Because of the infection, fluid builds up behind the eardrum.
Such artificial eardrums could be used to replace or repair eardrums that have become perforated through injury or disease, which again is particularly prevalent in young children.
Specialists warn that continuous use of cotton swabs may result in a punctured eardrum or push the earwax further inside trapping it in the ear canal, eventually leading to an ear inflammation.
Otoscopic and otomicrosopic check-up showed a foreign body, situated in the upper part of the right external auditory canal, next to eardrum. Since a leg had been identified, it was concluded that the foreign body was an insect.
Mr Bozman added that Ms Balmforth's injuries included a perforated eardrum.
Dr Mustafa said that the most common problems in children in UAE are fluid behind the eardrum because of a chronic middle ear infection and accumulation of wax in the external ear canal.
He said that passengers should chew a gum during take-off of an aeroplane as air pressure on the eardrum due to barotrauma results in the rupture of the eardrum and consequent deafness, adding that opening and closing the mouth by chewing is an important tip for the ear care.
When mammals hear a sound, first, airborne pressure waves thump against the eardrum. Then the drum jiggles tiny bones that translate large vibrations over the whole eardrum into smaller but intelligible sloshes in the third component, a liquid-filled chamber.
Its normal function is to equalise air pressure either side of the eardrum. The tube is normally closed but opens from time to time to allow air to flow into the middle ear and mucus to flow out - usually when we swallow, yawn or chew.