hearing aid

(redirected from ear trumpet)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hearing

 [hēr´ing]
the sense by which sounds are perceived, or the capacity to perceive sound; sound waves are converted into nerve impulses for interpretation by the brain. The organ of hearing is the ear, which is divided into the outer, middle, and inner ear, each with its own role. Connecting the middle ear with the nasopharynx is the eustachian tube, through which air enters to equalize the pressure on both sides of the tympanic membrane (eardrum). Called also audition.
As sound is conducted from the external ear to the inner ear, the sound waves undergo considerable transformation. The tympanic membrane (eardrum), ossicles, and cochlea act as a mechanical transformer to concentrate the sound waves so that they can be picked up by nerve endings in the inner ear and transmitted to the brain.
hearing aid an instrument to amplify sounds for those with hearing loss. There are two types of electronic hearing aids: the air-conduction type, which is worn in the external acoustic meatus, and the bone-conduction type, which is worn in back of the ear over the mastoid process.

Those who have conductive hearing loss can often use any one of the better aids with good results. Patients with otosclerosis will probably need the bone-conduction type of instrument. Those with sensorineural hearing loss (caused by injury to the vestibulocochlear nerve), or a mixed type, may have more trouble selecting a suitable hearing aid and may get less satisfactory results.

Those wearing a hearing aid for the first time should have special training in its proper use. A hearing aid picks up and amplifies all sounds in the vicinity. Often a person whose hearing has declined gradually will have lost the facility to ignore background noises. When one first tries a hearing aid, one's ears will be assaulted by the sounds of passing cars, of doors slamming, of telephones ringing. Training in how to filter out these noises and concentrate on the essential is necessary if the person is to get good results from the hearing aid. For best results, this should be combined with lessons in lipreading.

A cochlear implant can help profoundly deaf persons recognize and interpret various sounds. It does not restore hearing but can improve the quality of life for the deaf.
Hearing aids. From Lammon et al., 1995.
hearing (omaha) in the omaha system, a client problem in the physiologic domain.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hear·ing aid

(hēr'ing ād),
An electronic device for amplifying sound to the ear; consisting of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver.
Synonym(s): hearing instrument
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hearing aid

n.
A small electronic apparatus that amplifies sound and is worn in or behind the ear to compensate for impaired hearing.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hearing aid

Audiology A battery-powered electro-acoustic device that brings amplified sound to the ear to improve hearing, generally worn in the ear. See Hearing loss.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hear·ing aid

(hēr'ing ād)
An electronic amplifying device designed to bring sound more effectively into the ear; it consists of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver.
Synonym(s): hearing instrument.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hearing aid

Any device capable of increasing sound intensity at the ear, so as to assist the deaf. Electronic hearing aids traditionally consist of a microphone, an integrated circuit amplifier and an earpiece, often combined into a single device. Many include an electro-magnetic pickup for use in buildings or with telephones equipped with electro-magnetic sound radiation devices. Latest designs are intended for ear implantation and, instead of producing amplified sound from an earphone, apply output vibrations directly to the auditory ossicles, so eliminating feedback squeal. Amplification cannot relieve all cases of deafness.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hear·ing aid

(hēr'ing ād)
An electronic amplifying device designed to bring sound more effectively into the ear; it consists of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It didn't work, so Maelzel made him a series of ear trumpets but Beethoven was a fan of the metronome.
Armed with ear trumpets and led by members of a resistance moment, the Society of Underground Noise Defenders, ticket holders will embark on their journey of discovery with a view to banishing the intruder.
Ear trumpets (hearing aids) and a set of optician's testing glasses also featured in the Rogers Jones Co auction in Cardiff.
As Esmail notes, assistive technologies (like ear trumpets) and sound technologies (like the telephone and the phonograph) were products of a Victorian interest in deafness and signified a faith in technology to remedy deficiencies or disability.
In some of the concept drawings that were on view, megaphones either appear in various shapes, morphing into periscopes, ear trumpets, cones, and even architectural structures, or are posed with similar forms as if interacting with them.
Excuse the raised voice, but it's for the benefit of the colonels at the back clamping ear trumpets to their lugs.
And the FA, who through their ear trumpets probably thought the managers were asking for more blazer-clad councillors, put the matter under "serious consideration".
Just 25km south of Cologne, the famous attraction in Bonn is the Beethoven-Haus museum containing the composer's first viola, last pianoforte, notebooks, spectacles and the famous ear trumpets.
They limp into the Snal day of their championship match against Middlesex with just three front-line bowlers and a squad carrying so many aches and strains that it would not be at all surprising to see them take the Seld with the aid of Zimmer frames, ear trumpets and .
Even if you provided them all with ear trumpets they still wouldn't hear anything when the ball goes past the bat.
The installation consisted of oversize ear trumpets that, when activated by visitors, play fragments of Ludwig van Beethoven's late works, forming a location-specific link to Bonn, the composer's birthplace.
THE iPod generation is going to end up swapping its trendy white earplugs for ear trumpets, according to medical experts this week.