auditory ossicles

(redirected from ear bones)

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

[TA]
the small bones of the middle ear; they are articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.

auditory ossicles

The 3 diminutive bones of the middle ear. The malleus is attached to the inner face of the tympanic membrane at the manubrium and articulates at its head with the body of the incus; the incus in turn articulates at its lenticular process with the head of the stapes; the stapes is attached at its base by a ligamentous ring to the oval window of the vestibule. Sound waves channelled though the external acoustic canal (auditory duct) to the tympanic membrane are amplified by the auditory ossicles.

The vibrations received at the oval window are passed down the cochlea; the relative movement of the basilar and tectorial membranes leads to deflection of the stereocilia of the hair cells in the organ of Corti, which generates an influx of K+ ions and production of electrical signals that travel via the cochlear nerve to the auditory complex.

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

(aw'di-tōr-ē os'i-kĕlz) [TA]
The small bones of the middle ear; they are articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
Synonym(s): ossicula auditus [TA] , ear bones.

auditory ossicles

The chain of three tiny bone in the middle ear which acts as an impedance transformer, efficiently coupling the relatively large low-impedance movement of the ear drum to the smaller, high-impedance movement of the fluid in the cochlea of the inner ear.

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

(aw'di-tōr-ē os'i-kĕlz) [TA]
Small bones of middle ear articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
Synonym(s): ear bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research suggests that these stem cells are located in distinct parts of the ear drum, at the border (the annulus) and in the centre where the ear drum meets the middle ear bones (manubrium).
10.The malleus, one of the ear bones, comes from the Latin for what?
He was eventually diagnosed with fused inner ear bones, and the doctors went in and swapped them for prosthetic ones that vibrate like they are supposed to.
Beethoven died in 1827 and during autopsy, his skull was shattered, his jaw was knocked out of alignment, and his ear bones went missing.
Though the skeleton of the newly-discovered whale was dis-articulated during the dig, the closely-associated bones, particularly the ear bones helped them identify the animal in question.
I have a hereditary condition affecting the middle ear bones. One in three people who carry the gene have hearing loss triggered at some point, although it's unknown why.
Mooney is quick to note that his team didn't gather enough data to say definitively whether these whales could sense the particle motion present, but the anatomy of whale ear bones suggests that low-frequency vibrations could play a major role in whale hearing.
They were connected by little ear bones," added Daova for SITA.
In humans, the task of amplification is performed by the middle ear bones, while frequency analysis is done separately by the cochlear.
Unlike bony fish, such as salmon and cod, sharks don't have ear bones that build up calcified rings that reveal age.
Surgery is also required if the disease leads to complications, which can include facial nerve paralysis, erosion of the middle ear bones, and a labyrinth fistula.