dystrophic calcification


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calcification

 [kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
the deposit of calcium salts, mostly calcium phosphate, in body tissues. The normal absorption of calcium is facilitated by parathyroid hormone and by vitamin D. When there are increased amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood (as in hyperparathyroidism), there is deposition of calcium in the alveoli of the lungs, the renal tubules, the thyroid gland, the gastric mucosa, and the arterial walls. Normally calcium is deposited in the bone matrix to insure stability and strength of the bone and in growing teeth.
dystrophic calcification the deposition of calcium in abnormal tissue, such as scar tissue or atherosclerotic plaques, without abnormalities of blood calcium.
eggshell calcification deposition of a thin layer of calcium around a thoracic lymph node, often seen in silicosis.

dys·tro·phic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

calcification occurring in degenerated or necrotic tissue, as in hyalinized scars, degenerated foci in leiomyomas, and caseous nodules.

dystrophic calcification

The combination of fat necrosis and caseating necrosis, resulting in the focal deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in previously damaged tissues–eg, heart valves, scars, foci of TB and atherosclerotic blood vessels–arising in mitochondria, calcification in hyperparathyroidism which develops in the basement membrane of the renal tubules; DC may occur without hypercalcemia or defects of calcium metabolism

dys·tro·phic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dis-trō'fik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in degenerated or necrotic tissue, as in hyalinized scars, degenerated foci in leiomyomas, and caseous nodules.

dys·tro·phic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dis-trō'fik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in degenerated or necrotic tissue, as in hyalinized scars, degenerated foci in leiomyomas, and caseous nodules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dystrophic calcification is likely a result from inflammatory scarring in gallbladder wall.
The widely accepted etiopathogenesis for POF is the chronic irritation of the periosteal and periodontalmembrane causes metaplasia of the connective tissue and resultant initiation of formation of bone or dystrophic calcification. (8) The second group of researchers believe that POF might have developed initially as pyogenic granuloma and subsequent maturation led to the ossification of the lesion.
Because of the long-standing action of mechanical stress and proinflammatory factors, the aortic valve is usually affected by dystrophic calcification [24,25].
Petrification of the auricle has been attributed to ectopic ossification, dystrophic calcification, and metastatic calcification:
The differential diagnosis for pulmonary calcification includes dystrophic calcification in a prior injured lung as seen with infection mostly from tuberculosis or histoplasmosis, pulmonary hematoma or infarction, amyloidosis, necrotic tumors and other etiologies.
Microscopically the tissue composed of lobules of fibro-connective elements with abundant myxoid stroma, dystrophic calcification with scattered hemosiderin-laden macrophages, multinucleated giant cells and occasional squamous cells.
There were fragments of mature fibrous tissue with numerous cholesterol clefts, siderophages, and foci of dystrophic calcification. Follow-up CT 2 months postoperatively did not detect any recurrence.
Dot sign corresponds to edema, microcysts, foam cells, hyalinization of blood vessels, old hemorrhage and dystrophic calcification. (6,7) Diagnosis can be confirmed only on histopathology.
There is considerable debate as to whether this term accurately applies, as some investigators suggest that ISC is truly a late presentation of epidermal inclusion cysts that have undergone dystrophic calcification.[sup.8] Numerous theories about the pathogenesis of ISC have been proposed.
Peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) is a reactive gingival nodule composed of a cellular fibroblastic connective tissue stroma associated with the formation of randomly dispersed foci of mineralized product consisting of bone, cementum-like tissue, or dystrophic calcification. (1) It is widely considered that this non-neoplastic enlargement of the gingiva originates from the cells of the periodontal ligament (2) and is often associated with trauma or local irritants.
Both abrupt and gradual transitions of the basaloid cells to squamous and ghost cells were seen, along with areas of dystrophic calcification. The ghost cells contained abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with and without small hyperchromatic nuclei.
Pathologic Diagnosis: Metastatic Monophasic Spindle Cell Synovial Sarcoma With Dystrophic Calcification

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