dystrophia


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dystrophia

 [dis-tro´fe-ah] (Gr.)
dystrophia adiposogenita´lis adiposogenital dystrophy.
dystrophia epithelia´lis cor´neae dystrophy of the corneal epithelium, with erosions.
dystrophia myoto´nica myotonic dystrophy.
dystrophia un´guium changes in the texture, structure, and/or color of the nails due to no demonstrable cause, but presumed by some to be attributable to some disturbance of nutrition.

dys·tro·phy

(dis'trō-fē),
Progressive changes that may result from defective nutrition of a tissue or organ.
Synonym(s): dystrophia
[dys- + G. trophē, nourishment]

dys·tro·phy

(dis'trŏ-fē)
Abnormal development or growth of a tissue or organ, usually resulting from nutritional deficiency.
Synonym(s): dystrophia.
[dys- + G. trophē, nourishment]

dys·tro·phy

, dystrophia (dis'trŏ-fē, dis-trōfē-ă)
Progressive changes that may result from defective nutrition of a tissue or organ.
[dys- + G. trophē, nourishment]
References in periodicals archive ?
Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 is also named reflex sympathetic dystrophia. It is characterized with regional pain, vasomotor, "sudomotor" and sensory changes in the distal part of the extremity involved.
There was a significantly increased incidence of unstable alleles associated with dystrophia myotonica in infertile men in Houston and Melbourne, compared with study controls.
The incidence of dystrophia myotonica in the general population is estimated to be 5 in 100,000 people (0.00005%).
Dystrophia myotonica - emergency caesarean section with spinal anaesthesia.
Dystrophia myotonica and pregnancy - an instructive case.
Postoperative complications of dystrophia myotonica.
Continuous infusion of propofol in dystrophia myotonica.
Donations gratefully received towards the Research into Muscular Dystrophia Myotonica Wales.
(19) have demonstrated that paternally inherited disease-causing expansions of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene can be detected from maternal plasma.
Myotonic dystrophy, also referred to as dystrophia myotonica or Steinert's disease (7), is named after the German physician who first described the condition in 1904.
(17.) Pierce JW, Creamer B, MacDermot V Pharynx and oesophagus in dystrophia myotonica.