dysthymic disorder


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dysthymic disorder

 
a chronic mood disorder characterized by depressed feeling (sad, blue, low), loss of interest or pleasure in one's usual activities, and other symptoms typical of depression but tending to be longer in duration and less severe than in major depressive disorder.

dys·thy·mic dis·or·der

1. a chronic disturbance of mood characterized by mild depression or loss of interest in usual activities.
2. a DSM diagnosis is established when the specified criteria are met.

dysthymic disorder

[disthim′ik]
Etymology: Gk, dys + thymos, mind
a disorder of mood in which the essential feature is a chronic disturbance of mood of at least 2 years' duration. It involves either depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in all or almost all usual activities and pastimes, and associated symptoms, but not of sufficient severity and duration to meet the criteria for a major depressive episode.

dysthymic disorder

Minor depression psychiatry A condition characterized by '…a chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day, for more days than not, for at least 2 yrs…(persons so afflicted) describe their mood as sad or 'down in the dumps'. Cf Major depressive episode.

dys·thy·mic dis·or·der

(dis-thī'mik dis-ōr'dĕr)
A chronic disturbance of mood characterized by mild depression or loss of interest in usual activities.
See: depression
References in periodicals archive ?
When I first introduced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) to Bill as a means of treating his dysthymic disorder along with medication, he rejected CBT as "psychobabble.
In the dysthymic disorder study, respondents in the experimental group showed more rapid improvement relative to the control group at three months, but at the end of the six months the difference between the two groups was not significant.
However, the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criterion for dysthymic disorder among adults indicates that the individual has a depressed mood for most of the day, for at least two years [American Psychiatric Association (APA), 2000].
Partial contents, Part I: "Counselor Trainees' Assessment and Diagnosis of Lesbian Clients with Dysthymic Disorder," by Shelly K.
Presumptive conditions for former POWs, regardless of the length of captivity and if manifested to 10% or more after discharge or release from active military, naval, or air service include: psychosis, dysthymic disorder (depressive neurosis), posttraumatic osteoarthritis, any of the anxiety states, and cold injury.
This digest discusses the most frequently diagnosed mood disorders in children and adolescents, including major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, and bipolar disorder.
Nine women (45%) met criteria for a clinical psychiatric (Axis I) disorder but were in full remission from prior Axis I disorders including adjustment disorder, major depression, dysthymic disorder, panic disorder, and depressive disorder not otherwise specified.
O'Conner surveys two particular types of depression in the DSM-IV: Major Depressive Disorders (unipolar) and Dysthymic Disorder.
The depressive or "mood" disorders most seen with adolescents are Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Dysthymic Disorder (DD) (Reynolds, 1992), and the specific diagnostic criteria for these are outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994).
For purposes of this article, dark night is compared with two types of depression that are detailed in the DSM IV(APA, 1994)--Major Depressive Disorders 296x (unipolar) and Dysthymic Disorder (300.
Major depressive and dysthymic disorder in the prior year are assessed by the screening versions of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-SF) (Kessler, Andrews, Mroczek, et al.
The diagnosis for the seventh student included intermittent explosive disorder, conduct disorder, and dysthymic disorder.