dysthymic disorder


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dysthymic disorder

 
a chronic mood disorder characterized by depressed feeling (sad, blue, low), loss of interest or pleasure in one's usual activities, and other symptoms typical of depression but tending to be longer in duration and less severe than in major depressive disorder.

dys·thy·mic dis·or·der

1. a chronic disturbance of mood characterized by mild depression or loss of interest in usual activities.
2. a DSM diagnosis is established when the specified criteria are met.

dysthymic disorder

Minor depression psychiatry A condition characterized by '…a chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day, for more days than not, for at least 2 yrs…(persons so afflicted) describe their mood as sad or 'down in the dumps'. Cf Major depressive episode.

dys·thy·mic dis·or·der

(dis-thī'mik dis-ōr'dĕr)
A chronic disturbance of mood characterized by mild depression or loss of interest in usual activities.
See: depression
References in periodicals archive ?
Five-year course and outcome of dysthymic disorder: a prospective, naturalistic follow-up study.
Akiskal, who is also editor in chief of the Journal of Affective Disorders, noted that dysthymic disorder shares many similarities to major depressive disorder, including a familial association, phase advance of REM sleep, diurnal variation, sleep deprivation response, response to antidepressants, and treatment-emergent hypomania.
They concluded that out of the two hundred OCD participants 41.50% had depressive disorders, 8.0% met the criteria for major depressive disorder and 33.50% had dysthymic disorder
Dysthymic disorder (N=14 - 27.5%) was the most common current depressive disorder, followed by current major depressive disorder (MDD) (N=1 - 2%).
The first compared the internalizing disordered group (MDD or Dysthymic Disorder (DD)) to the externalizing disordered group (CD or Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)).
Clinical depression, whether major depression, dysthymic disorder, or adjustment disorder, has become a growing concern for the elderly population in the US.
She was diagnosed with major depressive illness, chronic dysthymic disorder, and a persistent personality disorder.
In the dysthymic disorder study, respondents in the experimental group showed more rapid improvement relative to the control group at three months, but at the end of the six months the difference between the two groups was not significant.
Depression can be subdivided into major depression, dysthymic disorder, and adjustment disorder with depressed mood (Conn & Kaye, 2001).
The psychopathological characteristics of group of people who committed suicide in the city of Medellin, 2000 to 2003 Suicides n = 108 Psychopathological characteristics (%) Psychiatric disorder (I) 97 (89,8) - major depressive episode 67 (62) - substance abuse or dependency 59 (54,6) Alcohol 46 (42,6) Cocaine 15 (13,9) Marihuana 26 (24,1) Benzodiazepines 9 (8,3) Inhalants 2 (1,9) opium-based substances 2 (1,9) - schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders 8 (7,4) - adaptive disorder 4 (3,7) - personality change due to frontal lesion 1 (0,9) - dysthymic disorder 1 (0,9) Personality disorder 18 (16,7) Psychiatric treatment 12 (11,1) Psychiatric hospitalisation during the last year 9 (8,3) Table 3.
Partial contents, Part I: "Counselor Trainees' Assessment and Diagnosis of Lesbian Clients with Dysthymic Disorder," by Shelly K.