dyssomnia


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dyssomnia

 [dis-som´ne-ah]
any of a group of primary sleep disorders characterized by disturbances in the quality, amount, or timing of sleep, including primary insomnia, primary hypersomnia, breathing-related sleep disorder, circadian rhythm sleep disorder, and narcolepsy. See also parasomnia.

dys·som·ni·a

(dis-som'nē-ă),
Disturbance of normal sleep or rhythm pattern.

dys·som·ni·a

(dis-som'nē-ă)
Disturbance of normal sleep or rhythm pattern.

Dyssomnia

A primary sleep disorder in which the patient suffers from changes in the quantity, quality, or timing of sleep.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
Dyssomnia improved from "moderate" and "severe" in 77.1% of participants at baseline to 76.6% reporting "absent" or "mild" at the end of the study.
Restlessness and nervous sleep disturbance (dyssomnia) are a common occurrence in childhood; this hyperkinetic behaviour being present in approximately 30% of children.
This study sought to investigate whether a combined valerian/lemon balm preparation would attenuate restlessness and dyssomnia in a group of 918 children.
The results demonstrated that the core symptoms were reduced from 'moderate/severe' to 'mild' or 'absent' in the majority of children, with 80.9% who suffered from dyssomnia experiencing some improvement.
The core symptoms dyssomnia and restlessness were reduced from "moderate/severe" to "mild" or "absent" in most of the patients.
In conclusion, Euvegal[R] forte was effective in the treatment of younger children with restlessness and dyssomnia and it was very well tolerated.
Keywords: Lemon balm/valerian combination; Restlessness; Dyssomnia; Children
Ademas, se agrego una busqueda dirigida a terapias cognitiva-conductual de las alteraciones del sueno, cuya estrategia de busqueda fue ["non-pharmacological interventions"] AND ["insomnia" OR "dyssomnias"].
* Dyssomnias: A broad category of sleep disorders characterised by either hypersomnolence or insomnia.
Disorders of sleeplessness (dyssomnias) are probably the most common sleep complaints of parents of young children and parents of children with DDs.
In 1990, sleep disorders were reclassified by the American Sleep Disorders Association into four major categories: dyssomnias, parasomnias, medical/psychiatric sleep disorders, and proposed sleep disorders.[19] Dyssomnias include disorders that may cause insomnia or excessive sleepiness, and are subclassified as intrinsic (eg, psychophysicological insomnia, narcolepsy, and restless legs syndrome), extrinsic (which includes transient and short-term insomnia), and circadian rhythm disorders (eg, jet lag syndrome and delayed sleep phase syndrome).