dysrhythmia

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dysrhythmia

 [dis-rith´me-ah]
disturbance of rhythm, such as of brain waves or the heartbeat.
cerebral dysrhythmia (electroencephalographic dysrhythmia) disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă),
Defective rhythm. See also entries under rhythm Compare: arrhythmia.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

/dys·rhyth·mia/ (dis-rith´me-ah)
1. disturbance of rhythm.
2. an abnormal cardiac rhythm; the term arrhythmia is usually used, even for abnormal but regular rhythms.dysrhyth´mic

cerebral dysrhythmia , electroencephalographic dysrhythmia a disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dysrhythmia

(dĭs-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormality in an otherwise normal rhythmic pattern, as of brain waves being recorded by an electroencephalograph.

dysrhythmia

[disrith′mē·ə]
any disturbance or abnormality in a normal rhythmic pattern, specifically, irregularity in the brain waves or cadence of speech. Compare arrhythmia.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective (abnormal) rhythm.
Compare: arrhythmia
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

Any irregularity or disturbance of a normal body rhythm. The term is most commonly applied to the heart beat or the ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM (EEG).

Arrhythmia or dysrhythmia

Abnormal rhythm in hearts that contract in an irregular way.
Mentioned in: Electrocardiography

dysrhythmia

abnormal timing and coupling of movements during gait; characteristic of cerebellar disease (see Table 1)
Table 1: Characteristic limb effects of cerebellar lesions
CharacteristicMuscular effects
DyssynergyMuscular decomposition
Accessory muscles used to achieve voluntary movements
Wide arc movements and past pointing
Aesthenia
Hyporeflexia
DysrhythmiaAbnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements
Abnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements during gait
DysmetriaThe loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement
The loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement during gait
Abnormal gaitUncoordinated ataxic gait
Wide-based gait
Slow, jerky, irregular cadence
Variation of stride length and foot placement from step to step, often with loss of balance
'Double tap' foot sounds, where foot contact occurs audibly in two phases: heel strike and toe contact
Constant postural adjustment

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective rhythm.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

disturbance of rhythm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with prior history of dysrhythmia, low ejection fraction (<30%), emergency/redo mitral valve replacement and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting were excluded.
Electrocardiogram abnormalities included QTc prolongation in 15 (68%) patients, QRS prolongation in nine (41%) patients, and ventricular dysrhythmia in eight (36%) patients.
Atrial fibrillation was the most common type of dysrhythmias among the patients, particularly those who developed delirium.
More commonly, HF is caused by prolonged metabolic stress on the heart, either due to increased workload--hypertension, valve damage, dysrhythmias or, in right-sided failure, lung disease--interrupted blood supply (coronary artery disease) or damage and scarring of the ventricle wall (MI, drug toxicity, alcohol).
Investigation of programs in place at other facilities in conjunction with literature review of cardiac dysrhythmias in patients with CKD were necessary to develop a program to specifically address the need identified.
Severe cardiovascular manifestations such as cardiac dysrhythmias, pulmonary oedema and cardiac failure, which are often associated with scorpionism in other regions of the world, are not such a prominent feature in southern Africa.
Uncorrected hypokalaemia can have many adverse effects including cardiac dysrhythmias and muscle weakness (3-6).
6] While serious side effects are rare, transient cardiac dysrhythmias (CD) may be associated with ESWL.
hospital costs associated with back pain, cardiac dysrhythmias, or acute cerebrovascular disease.
Contributed by sleep neurology specialists from North America, Europe, Israel, and Australia, cases outline history, exam findings and special investigations, diagnosis, treatment, and management for insomnia, hypersomnias, sleep-breathing disorders, parasomnias, sleep-related epilepsy, stroke, sleep-related movement disorders, circadian dysrhythmias, and neuromuscular disorders, with differential diagnosis where appropriate.