dysreflexia


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dysreflexia

 [dis″re-flek´se-ah]
a condition of disordered response to stimuli.
autonomic dysreflexia
1. an uninhibited and exaggerated response of the autonomic nervous system to stimulation, as seen in many patients with high spinal cord injuries; see also autonomic dysreflexia.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a life-threatening uninhibited sympathetic response of the nervous system to a noxious stimulus after a spinal cord injury at T7 or above.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dysreflexia

(dĭs′rĭ-flĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Abnormally increased or decreased response to physiologic stimuli.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dys·re·flex·i·a

(dis'rē-flek'sē-ă)
A condition of disordered or inappropriate responses to stimuli.
[dys- + reflex + -ia]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dysreflexia

(dĭs″rē′flĕks-ē-ă)
The state in which an individual with a spinal cord injury at T-7 or above experiences a life-threatening uninhibited sympathetic response of the nervous system to a noxious stimulus.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Autonomic dysreflexia may occur in patients with complete or incomplete spinal cord injury, tumors and autoimmune-induced myelodysplasia (3,4,5).
Studies reported an incidence of 2% to 57% of UTI following UDS and a 1,1% to 5,5% incidence of autonomic dysreflexia in patients suffering from SCI.
Autonomic dysreflexia as a complication of a fecal management system in a man with tetraplegia.
Autonomic dysreflexia, a medical emergency that must be recognized immediately, is a distinct type of autonomic dysfunction seen in patients with spinal cord injury at or above the T6 level.
No differences were found in the proportions of those with urinary tract infections, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary embolism and postural hypotension between the two groups (Table 3).
Wu, "Seizures secondary to autonomic dysreflexia," Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol.
Paski, "Autonomic dysreflexia resulting in seizure after colonoscopy in a patient with spinal cord injury," ACG Case Reports Journal, vol.
She outlined the suspected use of intentional induction of autonomic dysreflexia, where nausea stimuli send an afferent response which pumps out adrenaline reflexively-with downstream responses (elevated blood pressure) and potentially catastrophic consequences-but associated with up to a 10% enhancement in performance!
Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) can be a life-threatening complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), and management is largely supportive with removal of underlying noxious stimuli.
This includes, but is not limited to, anatomy and physiology, bladder, bowel and skin management, autonomic dysreflexia and sexuality rehabilitation.
In addition, preventative education on SCI-related precautions and contraindications relating to nutrition, hydration, clean catheterization, dysreflexia, and hypotension should be a part of routine patient education protocols (Lyder & Ayello, 2008; McKinley, Jackson, Cardenas, & DeVivo, 1999).