dysraphism

dysraphism

 [dis-rāf´iz'm]
incomplete closure of a raphe; defective fusion, particularly of the neural tube; see also neural tube defect.

dys·ra·phism

, dysraphia (dis'ră-fizm, dis-raf'ē-ă),
Defective fusion, especially of the neural folds, resulting in status dysraphicus or neural tube defect.
[dys- + G. rhaphē, suture]

dys·ra·phism

, dysraphia (dis'ră-fizm, -raf'ē-ă)
Defective fusion, especially of the neural folds, resulting in status dysraphicus or neural tube defect.
[dys- + G. rhaphē, suture]
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, of the 3 with tethered cord, only two had the cutaneous manifestation of occult spinal dysraphism. The incidence of absent Voluntary Bowel Movement (33.3%) and soiling (40%) was higher than the incidence of constipation (28.57%) in children with spinal abnormalities.
(2) Children with coccygeal skin tags often warrant concern because occult spinal dysraphism may be suspected; in addition to skin tags, sacral hemangiomas, dimples, or clusters of hair may also overlie a spinal malformation.
Pseudomeningocoeles usually form in the setting of trauma or as a complication of intentional or accidental durotomy at surgery, (1-6) while true meningocoeles occur in the setting of spinal dysraphism.
The patient's back is inspected for signs of occult spinal dysraphism. The penis should be evaluated for earlier surgery, meatal stenosis and palpable urethral abnormalities (stricture.
Kurzrock, "Renal cortical deterioration in children with spinal dysraphism: analysis of risk factors," The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, vol.
reported a case of a lumbar spinal ossifying lipoma in the subcutaneous region in communication with an intradural lipoma associated with spinal dysraphism [13].
The occurrence of spinal cord compression in childhood neoplasm ranges from 2.7 to 4% and is most often seen in the terminal phase of a widely metastatic cancer [5-8] Although rare cases of intraspinal and vertebrae metastasis have been reported in WT, intraspinal extension by direct contiguous spreading in a child devoid of spinal dysraphism has very infrequently been described.
Optic disc pit (ODP) and morning glory disc disorders are congenital cavitary anomalies of the optic disc, which are associated with dysraphism of the optic fissure.
The most common spinal lipomas are known to be associated with dysraphism in the lumbosacral region.[1] We present a rare case of a posterior mediastinal, intraspinal, intradural, intramedullary lipoma through a Kovalevsky canal combined with the failure of multiple segments from T3 to T6 in the thoracic spine.
spinal dysraphism, hydrocephalus, and cerebral palsy, as well as those who had children with urogenital abnormalities.
MRI of the spine (or spine ultrasound before six months of age) must be considered to rule out tethered cord and other neurogenic causes of BBD in the presence of any neurological deficits, particularly of the lower limbs, significant cutaneous lesions in the lumbosacral region, bony abnormalities of the spine, or after an incidental finding of occult spine dysraphism in abdominal X-ray in children with BBD.
There are various conditions, which affect spinal cord such as degenerative myelopathy, spinal dysraphism, spina bifida, myelodysplasia, metabolic globoid cell leukodystrophy, neoplasia, immune mediated conditions, tetanus, vascular anomalies and traumatic conditions (Birchard and Sherding, 1994).