dysproteinemia

dysproteinemia

 [dis-pro″tēn-e´me-ah]
1. disorder of the protein content of the blood.
2. a plasma cell dyscrasia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·pro·tein·e·mi·a

(dis-prō'tēn-ē'mē-ă),
An abnormality in plasma proteins, usually in immunoglobulins.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dys·pro·tein·e·mi·a

(dis-prō'tēn-ē'mē-ă)
An abnormality in plasma proteins, usually in immunoglobulins.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffuse pulmonary lymphoreticular infiltrations associated with dysproteinemia. Med Clin North Am.
The six reported cases and our case occurred with or without clinically apparent myeloproliferative disorders, such as multiple myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, or dysproteinemia. Although bone marrow puncture was not performed in our case, no abnormalities in protein electrophoresis of serum and urine or the serum free light chain ratio were observed; therefore, the involvement of myeloproliferative diseases was excluded.
175 patient serum samples with previously quantified M-proteins (range 0.2-6.2 g/dL) of known isotype (62 IgG, 36 IgA, and 77 IgM) were pulled from the Mayo Clinic Dysproteinemia Biobank (Cohort 2d).
California-based anatomic and clinical pathologist Gamble has produced a detailed guide based on 147 cases of renal involvement associated with dysproteinemia in university and community hospital settings over some 25 years.
* Patients with dysproteinemia (e.g., hemoglobinopathy, gout, Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia).
All queries to the Laboratory Information System or Dysproteinemia database followed a protocol on the "Natural History of Monoclonal Gammopathies," approved by the Mayo Clinic Institutional Review Board.
Cutaneous involvement in patients with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with dysproteinemia: a clinical, immunohistological, and molecular analysis.
Spurious hyperphosphatemia in patients with dysproteinemia is well documented (6, 7).
The 4 categories include (1) crystalline nephropathies seen in the setting of dysproteinemia, (2) drug-induced crystalline nephropathies, (3) crystalline nephropathies related to calcium deposition, and (4) metabolic and genetic forms of crystalline nephropathy.
(9) contains several important lessons that resonate with our own clinical laboratory experience, which involved a large dysproteinemia clinical practice, and our publications on diagnostic detection limit, which were from clinical trials and/or studies with well-defined patient groups.