dysprosium


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dysprosium

 (Dy) [dis-pro´ze-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 66, atomic weight 162.50. (See Appendix 6.)
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·pro·si·um (Dy),

(dis-prō'sē-ŭm),
A metallic element of the lanthanide (rare earth) series, atomic no. 66, atomic wt. 162.50.
[G. dysprositos, hard to get at]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dys·pro·si·um

(Dy) (dis-prō'sē-ŭm)
A metallic element of the lanthanide (rare earth) series, atomic no. 66, atomic wt. 162.50.
[G. dysprositos, hard to get at]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Canadian deposits contain the heavy rare earth elements dysprosium,
Working with the magnet company Intermetallics, materials scientist Satoshi Sugimoto of Tohoku University and colleagues recently developed fine-grained magnets that require 40 percent less dysprosium.
Some experts predict that by 2015 there will be a shortage of neodymium, terbium, and dysprosium, while supplies of europium, erbium, and yttrium could become tight.
Tiny quantities of dysprosium can make magnets in electric motors lighter by 90 per cent, while terbium--which is soft enough to cut with a knife--is a key component of low-energy light bulbs, which use 80 per cent less electricity than traditional incandescent globes.
Hanchar, personal communication, 1995), reproduced in Figure 14, indicate that the major element responsible for the luminescence is the rare earth element dysprosium, with possible contributions from terbium.
The newly developed magnet uses no terbium (Tb) or dysprosium (Dy), which are rare earths that are also categorized as critical materials(3) necessary for highly heat-resistant neodymium magnets.
All these metals play different roles in the functioning of a smartphone - neodymium, terbium and dysprosium, for example, are three rare metals that are used in providing phones the power to vibrate.
The 2016 Dysprosium Industry Market Report' is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the global Dysprosium industry with a focus on the Chinese market.
DYSPROSIUM (4 - 25 + 19 + 16 + 18 + 15 + 19) x (9 - 21 + 13) = 66
Readers will also recall that I dwelt on the discovery of dysprosium on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island in my April 2014 article "U.S.