dysprosium


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dysprosium

 (Dy) [dis-pro´ze-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 66, atomic weight 162.50. (See Appendix 6.)

dys·pro·si·um (Dy),

(dis-prō'sē-ŭm),
A metallic element of the lanthanide (rare earth) series, atomic no. 66, atomic wt. 162.50.
[G. dysprositos, hard to get at]

dysprosium

/dys·pro·si·um/ (Dy) (-pro´ze-um) a chemical element, at. no. 66.

dysprosium (Dy)

[disprō′sē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, dys + prositos, to approach
a rare-earth metallic element. Its atomic number is 66, and its atomic mass is 162.50. Radioactive isotopes of dysprosium are used in radioisotope scanning, particularly in studies of the bones and joints.

dys·pro·si·um

(Dy) (dis-prō'sē-ŭm)
A metallic element of the lanthanide (rare earth) series, atomic no. 66, atomic wt. 162.50.
[G. dysprositos, hard to get at]

dysprosium

a chemical element, atomic number 66, atomic weight 162.50, symbol Dy. See Tabe 6.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
1 2011-2016 Global Capacity, Production and Production Value of Dysprosium Industry
include small amounts of dysprosium and terbium, both available only
1962), the heavy rare earths predominate over the light rare earths, with dysprosium being most abundant.
Rare earth metals like neodymium and dysprosium are used in the powerful magnets in motors that power hybrid and electric cars, and demand is expected to surge as more of the environmentally friendly cars hit the market.
At the moment, electric vehicle motors generate force using magnets made from rare earth materials such as neodymium and dysprosium, which are mainly mined in China.
Colorado based Boulder Wind Power's patented wind turbine technology allows for the use of rare earth permanent magnets that do not require dysprosium, a relatively scarce rare earth, positioning it to compete directly with fossil fuel-based generation.
Dysprosium and neodymium, used in automotive and wind-power applications, soared more than threefold since May to $3,500 per kg and 62 per cent to $450 a kg respectively, according to Sojitz data.
Some deposits of heavy rare earths such as dysprosium, a component of magnets in hybrid car motors, contained twice as much as in the clays.
According to its local research carried out since summer 2009, the leftover products contain enough rare earth minerals for commercial use, including neodymium and dysprosium.
From this product, VNIIHT is currently conducting a further study, attempting to selectively extract each of the most valuable REOs: dysprosium, terbium, yttrium, neodymium, europium, and lutetium.
This decline in magnetic performance can be controlled by replacing neodymium with other rare earth elements, such as dysprosium and telbium, but even so it is difficult to maintain strong magnetic power at high temperature.
In conventional neodymium magnets, dysprosium alloying is indispensable for enhancing magnetic coercivity(6).