dysplastic nevus


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dys·plas·tic ne·vus

a nevus exceeding 5 mm in diameter, with irregular, indistinct, or notched borders and mixed tan-to-black and pink-to-red color. Microscopically these are basally nested and scattered intraepidermal melanocytes with hyperchromatic nuclei larger than those of basal keratinocytes. If multiple and associated with a family history of melanoma, these nevi have a high risk of malignant change, but isolated dysplastic nevi in the absence of a family history of melanoma are less frequently premalignant.
See also: malignant mole syndrome.
See: dysplastic nevus syndrome.

dysplastic nevus

Dermatology A premalignant skin lesion characterized by irregular, > 5 mm in diameter macules numbering from a few to hundreds with a central papule, variegated dark color and lenticular changes

dys·plas·tic ne·vus

(dis-plastik nēvŭs)
Skin malformation exceeding 5 mm in diameter, with irregular, indistinct, or notched borders and colored tan-to-black and pink-to-red.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dysplastic nevus syndrome: a phenotypic association of sporadic cutaneous melanoma.
Grossman referenced four cases in the medical literature in which the diagnosis was changed upon reexcision from dysplastic nevus to melanoma.
(2) On occasion, Spitz nevi may demonstrate greater degrees of atypia, characterized by higher-grade cytologic atypia, increased pagetoid scatter, and/or architectural overlap with dysplastic nevus, such that the terms dysplastic Spitz nevus or atypical Spitz nevus are used.
Wallace Clark first described what has become known as the dysplastic nevus, an entity clearly distinct from melanoma at one end of the spectrum and common acquired nevus at the other, he said.
The correct statement is: "The possibility exists that melanoma may someday be diagnosed at the biopsy site of an incompletely removed dysplastic nevus. Initially the question is, is it a recurrent nevus or a melanoma?
* Melanoma misdiagnosed as "dysplastic nevus involving margins." Reexcise if margins are positive.
Several proof-of-principle studies showed potential applications of FISH to solve a variety of diagnostic dilemmas in the evaluation of melanocytic tumors, including differentiating blue nevus-like metastasis from blue nevus, mitotically active nevus from nevoid melanoma, and dysplastic nevus from superficial spreading melanoma.
"The familial melanoma syndrome is not equivalent to the dysplastic nevus syndrome," a mantra that should prompt doctors to ask patients about their family histories even if patients don't look like they have any melanoma risk factors, she said.
The concept of the dysplastic nevus (DN) and its association with melanoma entered the literature around 1978 with the description by Clark et al (24) of the familial BK mole syndrome, (24,25) a concept subsequently clarified and expanded to include nonfamilial, sporadic cases.
The main differential diagnoses include dysplastic nevus and vulvar melanoma.
(44) Dysplastic nevi can be sporadic or inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion (dysplastic nevus syndrome), and both are related to increased risk for developing melanoma.