dysphoria

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dysphoria

 [dis-for´e-ah] (Gr.)
disquiet; restlessness; malaise. adj. adj dysphoret´ic, dysphor´ic.
gender dysphoria unhappiness with one's biological sex or its usual gender role, with the desire for the body and role of the opposite sex.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·pho·ri·a

(dis-fōr'ē-ă),
A mood of general dissatisfaction, restlessness, depression, and anxiety; a feeling of unpleasantness or discomfort.
[dys- + G. phora, a bearing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dysphoria

(dĭs-fôr′ē-ə)
n.
An emotional state characterized by anxiety, depression, or unease.

dys·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dysphoria

Neurology Unpleasant mood. See Gender dysphoria.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dys·pho·ri·a

(dis-fōr'ē-ă)
A mood of general dissatisfaction, restlessness, depression, and anxiety; a feeling of unpleasantness or discomfort.
[dys- + G. phora, a bearing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dysphoria

A state of unhappiness, anxiety and restlessness. The opposite of euphoria.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Dysphoria

Feelings of anxiety, restlessness, and dissatisfaction.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·pho·ri·a

(dis-fōr'ē-ă)
Mood of general dissatisfaction, restlessness, depression, and anxiety; a feeling of unpleasantness or discomfort.
[dys- + G. phora, a bearing]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There was also a significant main effect for Mood (F (1,41) = 8.67, p< .01), providing support for hypothesis 2 that dysphoric status would impact on generality of responses.
Negative Cues: ANOVA was non-significant for negative cues indicating that the generality of responses to negative cue words did not differ between men and women or between dysphoric and non-dysphoric people.
The source of interaction was the higher generality of response to neutral cues by the dysphoric women relative to the non-dysphoric women and both groups of men.
Comparison of male responses: A one-way within-subject ANOVA for Cue Type indicated that there was no significant difference across Cue Types for dysphoric men (p>.05).
Comparison of female responses: A one-way ANOVA indicated a significant main effect for Cue Type for dysphoric women (F(2,7)= 21.24, p<.001).
This study investigated the self-referential cognitive processes of dysphoric people and explored the possible impact of gender and cue type on responses to an AM task.
Similarly, reaction time effects in depressed samples have not always been shown (Kuyken & Dalgleish, 1995), and so were likely to weaken in a dysphoric sample.
A surprising finding was that dysphoric women provided more over-general responses than non-dysphoric women and both groups of men to neutral cues.
probes the fertile essence of the gender dysphoric patient and focuses