dysphonia


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dysphonia

 [dis-fo´ne-ah]
any voice impairment; difficulty in speaking. adj., adj dysphon´ic.
dysphonia clerico´rum clergyman's sore throat.

dys·pho·ni·a

(dis-fō'nē-ă),
Altered voice production.
[dys- + G. phōnē, voice]

dysphonia

(dĭs-fō′nē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in speaking, usually evidenced by hoarseness.

dys·phon′ic (-fŏn′ĭk) adj.

dysphonia

Neurology Speech impairment or difficulty, often due to vocal cord dysfunction. See Spasmodic dysphonia.

dys·pho·ni·a

(dis-fō'nē-ă)
Any disorder of phonation affecting voice quality or ability to produce voice.
See: aphonia
[dys- + G. phōnē, voice]

dysphonia

Impairment of normal voice production, from any cause, such as LARYNGITIS, singer's nodes, ‘CLERGYMAN'S THROAT’, paralysis of one of the nerves to the larynx (recurrent laryngeal nerve).
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, voice analysis can be used effectively to monitor progress of patient in spasmodic dysphonia, as it correlates well with stage and severity of disease measured by Voice Handicap Index (VHI).
Among the most common causes of dysphonia reported to ENT (ear nose and throat) specialists are:
The most common form of spasmodic dysphonia is the adductor type.
Dysphonias due to primary neurogenic disorders are a group of voice disorders that can be caused by both central and peripheral disorders of the larynx innervation [1,2].
POD 1 POD 2 P P L group H group L group H group Sore throat 2 6 0.140 3 12 0.012 Dysphonia 0 0 -- 0 1 0.315 Dysphagia 0 4 0.041 0 4 0.041 Cx 0 0 -- 0 0 -- Values are expressed as number of patients.
He said dysphonia is "a movement disorder of the throat muscles that create voice," and has many causes, including genetic factors, stroke or, as in Ms.
Recurrent laryngeal nerve section for spastic dysphonia. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 1976; 85:451-9.
Because there is effective treatment for both hearing loss and dysphonia, he says it's important that people with one disability be evaluated for the other.
"Infections of the pharynx and larynx are also favored so that cough is often associated with painful and inflamed throat and with dysphonia."
Key Words: EMG, biofeedback, dysphonia, voice disorders, vocal tension, vocal quality
A 53-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of a sore throat, followed by dysphonia ('hot potato voice'), dysphagia, slurred speech and finally partial compromise of the airway due to a large oropharyngeal mass.