dysphonia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dysphonia

 [dis-fo´ne-ah]
any voice impairment; difficulty in speaking. adj., adj dysphon´ic.
dysphonia clerico´rum clergyman's sore throat.

dys·pho·ni·a

(dis-fō'nē-ă),
Altered voice production.
[dys- + G. phōnē, voice]

dysphonia

/dys·pho·nia/ (-fo´ne-ah) a voice impairment or speech disorder.dysphon´ic

dysphonia

(dĭs-fō′nē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in speaking, usually evidenced by hoarseness.

dys·phon′ic (-fŏn′ĭk) adj.

dysphonia

[disfō′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + phone, voice
any abnormality in the speaking voice, such as hoarseness. Dysphonia puberum refers to the voice changes that occur in adolescent boys.

dysphonia

Neurology Speech impairment or difficulty, often due to vocal cord dysfunction. See Spasmodic dysphonia.

dys·pho·ni·a

(dis-fō'nē-ă)
Any disorder of phonation affecting voice quality or ability to produce voice.
See: aphonia
[dys- + G. phōnē, voice]

dysphonia

Impairment of normal voice production, from any cause, such as LARYNGITIS, singer's nodes, ‘CLERGYMAN'S THROAT’, paralysis of one of the nerves to the larynx (recurrent laryngeal nerve).
References in periodicals archive ?
The anterior cervical lymph nodes are enlarged, and she also shows dysphonia, retractions, and somnolence.
In abductor spasmodic dysphonia, sudden involuntary muscle movements or spasms cause the vocal folds to open.
In light of this, the aim of this study is to compare auditory, proprioceptive, and total vocal symptoms in patients with dysphonia, pre--and post--group therapy, and to associate the number of vocal symptoms to the gender, age, professional use of voice, and laryngeal diagnosis variables.
Many patients with malignant disease have preoperative dysphonia which is a poor prognostic indicator.
In adductor and abductor spasmodic dysphonia conditions, the voice sounds normal while singing, shouting, laughing, and crying (NIH, 2010a).
A 68-year-old woman with a spasmodic dysphonia presented in March 1999.
Chapter Eleven, "Spasmodic Dysphonia Redefined: Diagnosis, Assessment and Treatment" by Renata Whurr, explains this most poorly understood voice disorder and discusses the newly recognized fact that there is no cure for spasmodic dysphonia, but there is symptomatic relief by means of intralaryngeal injections.
A neurological disorder, spasmodic dysphonia sends vocal cords into spasms, causing the voice to break up or sound strained or strangled.
Oral examination showed right oropharyngeal swelling, but there was no dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea, or easy choking noted.
It is believed that accommodate parents' desires during the therapeutic process of the children is important to optimize treatment outcomes, not only on the pathology already installed, but also under the social and family environment of the child, which may be the etiological factors of children dysphonia 2.
This article describes the clinical uses of botulinum toxin to manage spasmodic dysphonia, singer's dystonia, essential vocal tremor, unilateral and bilateral laryngeal synkinesis, paradoxical vocal fold motion, and occupational oromandibular dystonia.
The dysphonia, dyspnoea, strider and cough suggest laryngotracheal involvement.