dysoxia

dysoxia

(dĭs-ŏk′sē-ă) [″ + ″ + ″]
A condition in which tissues cannot make full use of available oxygen.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Renal hypoxia and dysoxia after reperfusion of the ischemic kidney.
O2ER > 50% is generally considered a sign of impending exhaustion of the compensatory mechanisms (dysoxia) and impending decrease of VO2 (O2 uptake).
Ince, "Renal hypoxia and dysoxia after reperfusion of the ischemic kidney," Molecular Medicine, vol.
The cause of impaired consciousness is still unclear but it is likely to result from the in homogenous obstruction of the cerebral microcirculation by sequestered parasitized erythrocytes causing dysoxia and results in lactate production by the brain.
The authors interpreted these changes as evidence of tissue dysoxia. That none of the patients had clinical or enzymatic features of myocardial ischaemia or abnormal plasma lactate or pyruvate makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the role of tissue lactate and pyruvate in this setting (30).
The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria remains obscure, but reduced microcirculatory flow caused by sequestration of parasitized rigid erythrocytes, neuronal injury by malarial toxins, excessive cytokine production and focal dysoxia leading to axonal dysfunction are the major contributors to neurological disability, coma and death (4).
This activity perhaps elevated the atmospheric temperatures initially, however later contributed to the drop in ocean temperatures, sea level regressions and atmospheric dysoxia which is clearly indicated by the presence of carbon and elevated concentrations of Cerium.
Severe sepsis and septic shock are associated with profound derangements of tissue perfusion, which may contribute to cellular dysoxia and ultimately multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (1).
Intramucosal-arterial PCO2 gap fails to reflect intestinal dysoxia in hypoxic hypoxia.