dyslexic


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dys·lex·ic

(dis-lek'sik),
Relating to, or characterized by, dyslexia.

dyslexic

(dĭs-lĕk′sĭk) or

dyslectic

(-tĭk)
n.
A person who is affected by dyslexia.
adj.
Of or relating to dyslexia.

dys·lex·ic

(dis-lek'sik)
Relating to, or characterized by, dyslexia.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It is often said that behind every successful dyslexic is an invested and persistent mother (or parent).
As the average primary school class consists of 27 students, and the average secondary school class is 20 students, it can be estimated that teachers will have between one and five dyslexic students in each class.
Made By Dyslexia founder and chief executive Kate Griggs said: "If we're to prepare dyslexic individuals and enable them to flourish, we must ensure that educators and employers are enabled and empowered to recognise and support this valuable way of thinking.
A study carried out with Bosnian dyslexic children (12) validated the hypothesis of phonological deficit (6) to explain the high frequency of errors in the writing of children with dyslexia, unlike results obtained in a Greek-language research (13), with transparent orthography (greater phoneme-grapheme regularity).
About 34 dyslexic children (61.70%) experienced difficulty in copying from the blackboard, 31 children (56.30%) were confused following instructions while playing games.
"My sister-in-law in Australia works with dyslexic children and told me about the font and how it was working wonders with her pupils.
According to Pirani and Sasikumar (2012), dyslexic individuals are characterized by slow conceptual development, poor retention ability, short attention span and/or weak sense of spatial awareness.
Just as the Phonological Theory, the Allophonic Theory is also subject to criticisms for disregarding the findings about non-linguistic deficits in dyslexic individuals, like the auditory perception deficit.
"By tracking an individual's reading pathways, we will be able to identify dyslexic children far more easily which will mean they will be able to start intervention strategies at a time when they are going to make the most impact."
All proceeds will benefit the nonprofit Dyslexic Advantage whose mission is to "promote positive identity, community, and achievement among dyslexic people by focusing on their strengths."
The findings could raise questions around the effectiveness of ophthalmic interventions for dyslexic children, such as coloured filters to help with reading.
A HEADTEACHER from a Midland school has urged parents to voice their concerns if they fear their child is dyslexic.