dyskinesia

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dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, our findings cannot be extrapolated to other subgroups of volunteers (males without experience in resistance exercises, participants with chronic pain, scapular dyskinesis or other self-reported or diagnosed problem), as well as exercise mode (i.e.
For example, a patient may have a seemingly normal scapular resting height, but still have a tendency of pulling their scapulae back and down during exercise, or have scapular dyskinesis, which may lead to intermittent compression of the neurovascular bundle.
Visual scapular Lopes Determinare la cinematica dyskinesis: et al scapolare e Fattivita kinematics and muscle 2015 (15) muscolare in soggetti activity alterations con SI con e senza in patients with discinesia scapolare subacromial durante il movimento impingement syndrome d'elevazione.
Scapular dyskinesis and its relation to shoulder pain, J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2003;11:142-151.
The cardiac catherization showed no evidence of obstructive coronary heart disease, increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and marked distal anterior and distal inferior wall hypokinesis with apical dyskinesis. A follow-up chest x-ray showed improvement.
Forward head posture (FHP) is one of the most common cervical abnormalities that predisposes individuals toward pathological conditions, such as headache [6-7], neck pain [8-9], temporomandibular disorders [10], vertebral bodies disorders [11], soft-tissue length and strength alteration [12-13], or even scapula and shoulder dyskinesis [14-15].
She reports no exertional chest pain, and a recent stress echocardiogram showed normal wall motion with apical dyskinesis and an ejection fraction of 55%.
The Mayo criteria (all must be met) for diagnosis of this syndrome include the presence of transient left ventricle apical akinesis or dyskinesis, absence of obstructive coronary disease, new electrocardiographic abnormalities and absence of concurrent conditions such as head trauma, intracranial bleeding, phaeochromocytoma, myocarditis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (15).
At school I should have been labelled as suffering from anophthalmia sphero ('no eye for a ball') or hysterical oculomanual dyskinesis ('Catch it, you idiot!').
(5) One may qualitatively assess regional wall motion and dyskinesis and objectively quantify ejection fraction and stroke volume.
(6) In case of innervational dyskinesis (for example, cerebral sclerosis as an associated symptom of the AMD), the original direction of molecular activities cannot be sustained.