dyskinesia


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dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]
References in periodicals archive ?
* Papers should address specific issues related to the theme of tardive dyskinesia and be no longer than 15 double-spaced typed pages in length (excluding references and illustrations).
Evaluation of LID Severity: All of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats with severe dopaminergic denervation and treated with chronic intermittent L-dopa-benserazide injections developed dyskinesia and demonstrated increased number of contralateral turning behavior during the 21 days of L-dopa treatment period.
Athletes with reduced external rotational strength and scapular dyskinesia have heightened sensitivity to shoulder injury with smaller increases in load.
"A better solution would be a portable device that identifies and monitors dyskinesia while patients are at home and going about day-to-day life, broadcasting data to their clinicians through simple mobile technology."
On Day 15, in the levodopa plus zonisamide group, locomotive dyskinesia scores at 20 min to 160 min after drug injection were significantly higher when compared with those of the levodopa only group (Figure 3(a)).
Istradefylline, a selective adenosine A2A antagonist, recently licensed in Japan for clinical use as an adjunct treatment,[sup][14],[53] is capable of reducing off time in the management of motor complications in advanced PD.[sup][12],[15],[54] However, treatment with istradefylline could result in adverse reactions, of which dyskinesia is the most common.
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) can occur in up to 20% of schizophrenia patients receiving long-term antipsychotics (APs) [1-4], and is associated with considerable personal suffering and social and physical disabilities.
Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Diagnosis and standards of care.
Antiparkinsonism agents generally does not improve neuroleptic induced dyskinesia. Decreasing the dose of neuroleptic may temporarily worsen TD, but in some patients increasing the dose of neuroleptic may reduce symptoms thereby masking the TD.
* The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Dyskinesia
* The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Dyskinesia and enlists all their major and minor projects
Morningside's investment in Synchroneuron demonstrates our belief in the potential of SNC-102 to safely and effectively treat neuropsychiatric disorders such as tardive dyskinesia as well as its potential in additional indications, said Gerald Chan, Chairman of Morningside Technology Ventures.