dyskinesia


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dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

/dys·ki·ne·sia/ (-kĭ-ne´zhah) distortion or impairment of voluntary movement, as in tic or spasm.dyskinet´ic
biliary dyskinesia  derangement of the filling and emptying mechanism of the gallbladder.
dyskinesia intermit´tens  intermittent disability of the limbs due to impaired circulation.
orofacial dyskinesia  facial movements resembling those of tardive dyskinesia, seen in elderly, edentulous, demented patients.
primary ciliary dyskinesia  any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways, often accompanied by lack of motion of sperm.
tardive dyskinesia  an iatrogenic disorder of involuntary repetitive movements of facial, buccal, oral, and cervical muscles, induced by long-term use of antipsychotic agents, sometimes persisting after withdrawal of the agent.

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.

dyskinesia

[dis′kinē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + kinesis, movement
an impairment of the ability to execute voluntary movements. Tardive dyskinesia is caused by an adverse effect of prolonged use of phenothiazine medications in elderly patients or persons with brain injuries. See also tardive dyskinesia. dyskinetic [-et′ik] , adj.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.

dyskinesia

difficulty in performing voluntary movements

dyskinesia (dis·ki·nēˑ·zhē·),

n difficulty of movement due to vertebral subluxation; one of the diagnostic components of the three-dimensional chiropractic assessment model. See also subluxation, vertebral.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

impairment of the power of voluntary movement.

ciliary dyskinesia
see primary ciliary dyskinesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A better solution would be a portable device that identifies and monitors dyskinesia while patients are at home and going about day-to-day life, broadcasting data to their clinicians through simple mobile technology.
Preladenant, another adenosine A2A antagonist, improved motor ability without worsening dyskinesia in rodent and primate models of PD.
Miscellaneous treatments for neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia.
Characterized by uncontrolled movement of the face and body, tardive dyskinesia is a side effect in up to 8% of patients taking typical and atypical antipsychotics.
As Tardive dyskinesia is frequently associated with first generation neuroleptics, these medications should be used restrictively only in major mental disorder and also doses should be kept low.
It was learned that oral dyskinesia was not present before and had started a few days after he discontinued his medication.
The report reviews pipeline therapeutics for Dyskinesia by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
Although this form of dyskinesia was generally mild, in some case, it became disabling, requiring surgical intervention by deep brain stimulation [26].
Coverage of the Dyskinesia pipeline on the basis of target, MoA, route of administration and molecule type
Gardos et al (4) described 2 other forms of delayed dyskinesias related to antipsychotic use but resulting from antipsychotic discontinuation: withdrawal dyskinesia and covert dyskinesia.
SNC-102 has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug for tardive dyskinesia, a debilitating and often irreversible movement disorder, said William Kerns, DVM, Chief Executive Officer of Synchroneuron Inc.
Camner and coworkers first suggested ciliary dyskinesia as the cause of Kartagener syndrome in1975.