dyskeratosis


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dyskeratosis

 [dis″ker-ah-to´sis]
abnormal, premature, or imperfect development of the keratinocytes. adj., adj dyskeratot´ic.

dys·ker·a·to·sis

(dis'ker-ă-tō'sis),
1. Premature keratinization in individual epithelial cells that have not reached the keratinizing surface layer; dyskeratotic cells generally become rounded and they may break away from adjacent cells and fall off.
2. Epidermalization of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium.
3. A disorder of keratinization.
[dys- + G. keras, horn, + -osis, condition]

dyskeratosis

/dys·ker·a·to·sis/ (-ker-ah-to´sis) abnormal, premature, or imperfect keratinization of the keratinocytes.dyskeratot´ic

dyskeratosis

[dis′kerətō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, dys + keras, horn, osis, condition
an abnormal or premature keratinization of epithelial cells.

dys·ker·a·to·sis

(dis-ker'ă-tō'sis)
1. Premature keratinization in individual epithelial cells that have not reached the keratinizing surface layer; dyskeratotic cells generally become rounded, and they may break away from adjacent cells and fall off.
2. Epidermalization of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium.
3. A disorder of keratinization.
[dys- + G. keras, horn, + -osis, condition]

dyskeratosis

Abnormal, excessive or imperfect KERATINIZATION of cells of the EPIDERMIS. DYSPLASIA of a squamous epithelium.

dyskeratosis

abnormal keratinization characterized by incomplete conversion of skin cells to keratin, usually characterized by scaling and parakeratosis

dyskeratosis

Abnormal process which, in the eye, results in hornification of the epithelial layer of the conjunctiva or cornea. It may be hereditary or due to irritation (e.g. radiation) or to prolonged drug administration in the eye. It appears as a dry white plaque (called leucoplakia or leucokeratosis). It may be benign or malignant, in which case it must be surgically excised. See pterygium.

dys·ker·a·to·sis

(dis-ker'ă-tō'sis)
Premature keratinization in individual epithelial cells that have not reached the keratinizing surface layer.
[dys- + G. keras, horn, + -osis, condition]

dyskeratosis (dis´kerətō´sis),

n an irreversible alteration in the maturation of stratified squamous epithelium. Refers to an increase of abnormal mitosis, individual cell keratinization, epithelial pearls within the spinous layer, loss of polarity of the cells, hyperchromatism, nuclear atypia, and basilar hyperplasia.
Enlarge picture
Dyskeratosis.

dyskeratosis

abnormal, premature or imperfect keratinization of the keratinocytes as in primary seborrhea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differential diagnosis includes Werner syndrome, focal dermal hypoplasia, alopecia areata, aplasia cutis congenita, incontinentia pigmenti, dyskeratosis congenital, familial simple anhidrosis, Naegeli-Franceschetti-Jadassohn syndrome, and pachyonychia congenita.
Dyskeratosis congenita should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for inherited bone marrow failure syndrome and evaluated with cytogenetics and/or telomere studies.
Reticulated hyperpigmentation without papules or plaques may occur in dyskeratosis congenita.
Histologically, epithelial pleomorphism, dyskeratosis, nuclear variability and mitotic activity were observed.
The epidermis often shows edema with spongiosis and increased cell layers with parakeratosis, hyperkeratosis, and dyskeratosis.
Telomere dysfunction is the hallmark of the telomere syndromes, conditions that are clinically characterized by premature aging and are exemplified by dyskeratosis congenita (DC) [3].
At an initial consultation a blood sample was taken from the patient for "research purposes" but possibly to exclude dyskeratosis congenital, the condition from which he was actually suffering.
The brave four-year-old from Kells, Co Meath, suffered from a rare bone marrow disorder called Dyskeratosis Cognetia, which affects just one in a million children worldwide.
4] Hymenoptera sting lesions can present as focal spongiosis, dyskeratosis, or hyperplasia.
Dyskeratosis congenital (DC), also called Zinsser-Engman-Cole syndrome, is a rare, multi-system, hereditary disease, which was first described by Zinsser in 1906.
Collins achieved fame by showing that defects in telomerase (the enzyme that lengthens telomeres) are linked with a genetic disease called dyskeratosis congenita, which is associated with bone marrow failure.
Under a microscope, Grover's disease has a characteristic appearance of acantholytic dyskeratosis (FIGURE 2); it can be similar in appearance to Darier's disease, Hailey-Hailey disease, or pemphigus.