dysjunction

dys·junc·tion

(dis-jŭnk'shŭn),
A separation of parts or structures normally joined; cleavage.

dys·junc·tion

(dis-jŭngkshŭn)
A separation of parts or structures normally joined; cleavage.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, our institution has a dedicated Women's Urology and Pelvic Health Center that accommodates women ages 18 to 96 years for issues regarding bladder dysfunction, pelvic pain, pelvic floor dysjunction, IC, and sexual dysfunction.
Axo-glial dysjunction. A novel structural lesion that accounts for poorly reversible slowing of nerve conduction in the spontaneously diabetic biobreeding rat.
Blocksidge contends that the dysjunction between Housman the poet and Housman the scholar is on the surface obvious, but to see HousmanAEs life as divided in any fundamentally psychological sense is misleading.
Written now almost a century ago by one for whom English was not his first language, "The Chaos" still stands as an edifice, no, as THE supreme dissertation on the dysjunction between English spelling and pronunciation.
Greene, "Histopathological heterogeneity of neuropathy in insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, and demonstration of axo-glial dysjunction in human diabetic neuropathy," Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol.
(19) As he moves further from the use of Olson and Creeley as models in the early 80s towards Stein and the Silliman of The New Sentence, and Language writing practitioners more generally, the unit of composition in Wystan's texts becomes more insistently the sentence and the emphasis falls increasingly on temporal, spacial and structural dysjunction (a punning) generated between sentences and semantic-syntactic entities, something for which Wystan approvingly cites Silliman's 'torquing' concept.
After closure, the neuro-ectoderm separates from the cutaneous ectoderm (dysjunction), and the space between is filled by mesoderm.