dysgonic

dysgonic

 [dis-gon´ik]
seeding badly; said of bacterial cultures that grow poorly.

dys·gon·ic

(dis-gon'ik),
A term used to indicate that the growth of a bacterial culture is slow and relatively poor; used especially in reference to the growth of cultures of the bovine tubercle bacillus (Mycobacterium bovis).
See also: eugonic.
[dys- + G. gonikos, relating to the seed or offspring]

dysgonic

(dĭs-gŏn′ĭk)
Pert. to a bacterial culture of sparse growth.
References in periodicals archive ?
canimorsus was previously known as CDC group DF-2 (dysgonic fermenter type 2) and was first isolated from a man who had experienced multiple dog bites and developed septicemia and meningitis.
A zoonotic ringworm outbreak caused by a dysgonic starin of Microsporum canis from stray cats.
The bacterium can be identified now by the characteristic disease it produces in guinea pigs, the characteristic death pattern in eggs, the at best dysgonic growth on the bacterial media tried, and by the fluorescent antibody staining results.
bovis shows a dysgonic colony shape on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, is negative for niacin accumulation and nitrate reduction, is susceptible to thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (TCH), and shows microaerophilic growth on Lebek medium (1-3).
canirnorsus, previously classified as CDC Group Dysgonic Fermenter-2 (DF-2), is a slow-growing, gram-negative bacterium that requires carbon dioxide for growth (2).
Dysgonic fermenter-2: a clinico-epidemiologic review.
bovis shows dysgonic growth on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium and has been described as negative for nitrate reduction and niacin accumulation (2).
Subcultures remained negative on L6wenstein-Jensen slants but after approximately 4 weeks became positive on mycobactin-supplemented Middlebrook slants with colorless dysgonic colonies.