dysgenics


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dysgenics

(dĭs-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The belief that deterioration of the human gene pool occurs by the increased survival and reproduction of people with undesirable traits.

dys·gen′ic adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet during the very century in which, The Bell Curve says, dysgenics has run wild globally, overall scores on IQ tests have consistently risen by decade, among blacks as well as whites.
The authors can't deal with this factor because not only would it foul up claims of dysgenics; dealing with it forces you to confront the fact that many studies show children's IQs tend to be higher in smaller families.
Lynn is described in his 1996 volume, Dysgenics: Genetic Deterioration in Modern Populations, as a graduate in psychology from the University of Cambridge and Director of the Ulster Institute for Social Research, Coleraine, Northern Ireland.
To support Richard Lynn's Dysgenics: Genetic Deterioration in Modern Populations [1996]; Eugenics: A Reassessment [2001]; and The Science of Human Diversity: A History of the Pioneer Fund [2001].
A case for dysgenics. The Journal Forum for Contemporary History.
Pearson (Ed.), Shockley on race, eugenics, and dysgenics. Washington, DC: Scott-Townsend.
Hitler's own ideas are analyzed and Glad states that Hitler did not have a clear view of dysgenics but was motivated more by a desire to preserve and improve the Nordic race, comprising specifically the Germanic peoples (which he saw as including the English, the Scandinavians, and related European peoples) as a genetic entity.