dysesthesia


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dysesthesia

 [dis″es-the´zhah]
1. impairment of any sense, especially of the sense of touch.
2. a painful, persistent sensation induced by a gentle touch of the skin.

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
3. Abnormal sensations experienced in the absence of stimulation.
[G. dysaisthēsia, fr. dys-, hard, difficult, + aisthēsis, sensation]

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
3. Abnormal sensations experienced in the absence of stimulation.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia.

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia
References in periodicals archive ?
Prevention of development of postoperative dysesthesia in transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for intracanalicular lumbar disc herniation: Floating retraction technique.
Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include tingling or pins-and-needles dysesthesia and pain, beginning in the distal feet and hands and spreading proximally in a stocking/glove type distribution [1, 2].
Next, after confirming dysesthesia, 2% xylocaine was injected.
A week ago, he developed progressive edema in the lower limbs, which was followed 48 hours before admission by dysesthesia and paraparesis as well as urinary incontinence.
A 26-year-old man was referred to our hospital with complaints of progressive restriction of the range of motion of his left shoulder and worsening pain and dysesthesia of the left arm and hand.
She had a history of burning, a pricking type of dysesthesia (pins and needles feeling), intermittent in nature and radiated to the left temporal and orbital region.
Clinical findings of CTS are pain and dysesthesia in the median nerve distribution, in the region of the thumb, index, middle and the lateral half of the ring finger which may worsen during sleep (13).
A 43-year-old female patient presented with acute-onset fever, headache, dysarthria, amnesia, left-side weakness, and dysesthesia. Initial brain computed tomography scans showed a 7 cm, mass-like lesion in the right frontoparietal region, suggesting a brain tumor.
The tumor is observed most frequently in the mandible as an expansible mass that can cause pain, paresthesia and dysesthesia. Almost half of the cases in the literature have been reported to be malignant transformation of ameloblastic fibroma.
Patients may report pain, stiffness, dysesthesia and dysfunction (scapular, thoracic and costovertebral) of an acute or chronic nature in this area with only temporary relief following normal care by their health professional.
(16) described the intraoral buccal and lingual approach and discussed the advantages and the possible risks of dysesthesia of the tongue and fracture of the mandible.