dysarthria


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dysarthria

 [dis-ahr´thre-ah]
imperfect articulation of speech due to disturbances of muscular control resulting from central or peripheral nervous system damage.

dys·ar·thri·a

(dis-ar'thrē-ă),
A disturbance of speech due to emotional stress, to brain injury, or to paralysis, incoordination, or spasticity of the muscles used for speaking.
Synonym(s): dysarthrosis (1)
[dys- + G. arthroō, to articulate]

dysarthria

/dys·ar·thria/ (dis-ahr´thre-ah) a speech disorder caused by disturbances of muscular control because of damage to the central or peripheral nervous system.

dysarthria

(dĭs-är′thrē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in articulating words, caused by impairment of the muscles used in speech.

dysarthria

[disär′thrē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + arthroun, to articulate
difficult, poorly articulated speech, resulting from interference in the control and execution over the muscles of speech usually caused by damage to a central or peripheral motor nerve.

dysarthria

A generic term for any speech disorder caused by an alteration of strength and control of speech muscles due to damage to the brain or nerves. Dysarthria may indicate increased posterior fossa pressure on the brainstem/medulla oblongata.
 
Clinical findings
Difficulty in speaking or forming words.

dysarthria

Neurology A group of speech disorders caused by disturbances in the strength or coordination of speech muscles due to damage to the brain or nerves; dysarthria may indicate ↑ posterior fossa pressure on the brainstem/medulla oblongata Clinical Difficulty in speaking or forming words. See Speech pathology.

dys·ar·thri·a

(dis-ahr'thrē-ă)
A disturbance of speech due to paralysis, incoordination, or spasticity of the muscles used for speaking.
Synonym(s): dysarthrosis (1) .
[dys- + G. arthroō, to articulate]

dysarthria

Inability to speak normally because of loss of functional control over the muscles of the tongue, lips, cheeks or larynx. This usually results from neurological disorder such as STROKE.

dys·ar·thri·a

(dis-ahr'thrē-ă)
A disturbance of speech due to emotional stress or other causes.
[dys- + G. arthroō, to articulate]

dysarthria (disärth´rēə),

n a speech impediment brought on by emotional distress, paralysis, or muscle spasticity.
References in periodicals archive ?
His symptoms of dysarthria and dysphagia began subsiding 3 months after injection, and improvements in soft palate and tongue movements were observed at the 4-month follow-up.
If a teacher uses the above or similar criteria to assess students and has to assess a student with dysarthria (or other speech difficulties), these criteria need to be contrasted and valued in relation to the student's abilities in their mother tongue.
Furthermore, although decompression was not performed, swallowing disturbance and dysarthria associated with lower cranial nerve palsy resolved during a follow-up period after posterior fusion.
2], gait disturbance (76%), dysarthria (71%), and bradykinesia (47%) were the most common neurologic features.
On examination, higher mental functions were normal (MMSE 28/30), but the patient had marked dysarthria with prominent nasal speech and lip weakness; the eye movements were full except for some mild restriction of lateral gaze to both sides.
Sensorimotor impairments such as muscle weakness, incoordination, reduced or excessive movement, involuntary muscle activity, and altered tone occur across multiple dysarthria types, so clinicians must identify particular configurations of these abnormalities in order to differentiate among the disorders [3].
No players in the study had dysarthria, Parkinson's Disease or cerebellar dysfunction.
The scheme could also help people with speech impairments including dyspraxia, dysarthria and help those facing difficulties due to Huntington's disease, Motor neurone disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.
An 87-year-old gentleman was admitted after sudden dysarthria and left facial palsy due to a right internal carotid artery occlusion.
A 28 year old man presented to us with worsening spastic weakness for last 10 years and dysarthria and occasional seizures for last 4 years.
The dysarthria improved to the extent he was able to clearly deliver a speech to an audience.
Following therapy, the patient's ability to speak improved from dysarthria to being able to deliver a speech clearly to an audience.