dysarthria


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dysarthria

 [dis-ahr´thre-ah]
imperfect articulation of speech due to disturbances of muscular control resulting from central or peripheral nervous system damage.

dys·ar·thri·a

(dis-ar'thrē-ă),
A disturbance of speech due to emotional stress, to brain injury, or to paralysis, incoordination, or spasticity of the muscles used for speaking.
Synonym(s): dysarthrosis (1)
[dys- + G. arthroō, to articulate]

dysarthria

(dĭs-är′thrē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in articulating words, caused by impairment of the muscles used in speech.

dysarthria

A generic term for any speech disorder caused by an alteration of strength and control of speech muscles due to damage to the brain or nerves. Dysarthria may indicate increased posterior fossa pressure on the brainstem/medulla oblongata.
 
Clinical findings
Difficulty in speaking or forming words.

dysarthria

Neurology A group of speech disorders caused by disturbances in the strength or coordination of speech muscles due to damage to the brain or nerves; dysarthria may indicate ↑ posterior fossa pressure on the brainstem/medulla oblongata Clinical Difficulty in speaking or forming words. See Speech pathology.

dys·ar·thri·a

(dis-ahr'thrē-ă)
A disturbance of speech due to paralysis, incoordination, or spasticity of the muscles used for speaking.
Synonym(s): dysarthrosis (1) .
[dys- + G. arthroō, to articulate]

dysarthria

Inability to speak normally because of loss of functional control over the muscles of the tongue, lips, cheeks or larynx. This usually results from neurological disorder such as STROKE.

dys·ar·thri·a

(dis-ahr'thrē-ă)
A disturbance of speech due to emotional stress or other causes.
[dys- + G. arthroō, to articulate]
References in periodicals archive ?
Brady, "Aphasia and dysarthria in acute stroke: Recovery and functional outcome," International Journal of Stroke, vol.
In October, she presented to the hospital with confusion, lethargy, dysarthria, worsening of movements, and decreased taste in her mouth and was found hypothermic a second time (T: 33.5[degrees]C) (see Table 1).
During the course of the disease, findings such as characteristic phenotype chorea, orofacial dyskinesia, involuntary vocalizations, dysarthria, and dystonia are accompanying symptoms in many patients.
All this highlights the uniqueness of this study, in light of the shortage of this topic in the literature, in particular, the absence of a link between the impact of dysarthria to quality of life.
A 52-year-old previously healthy Caucasian female presented to the emergency department with a 1-month history of diplopia, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia.
Clinical and neurologic examination revealed notably broad-based ataxic gait, hypotonia, poor coordination, truncal titubation, positive romberg sign, dysmetria, and dysarthria. Cranial nerve examination produced normal results.
Probable symptoms indicative of APD included time of evolution of the disease (around 10 years), limitation to perform basic activities of daily living, even if not requiring help, functional disability due to dyskinesia that covered more than 25% of waking day, moderate dysphagia, freezing of gait, moderate or severe dysarthria, and hallucinations without preserved insight (Table 2).
Key Words: Oral Submucous Fibrosis , Tongue flap, Dysarthria, Dysphagia.
Three distinct stages of illness are recognized, with ataxia and dysarthria being common initial presenting signs.
A different type of speech problem, called dysarthria, is caused by weakness, slowness, changes in muscle tone, or lack of coordination of the tongue, lips, soft palate, throat, vocal cords and diaphragm.
The tumor had compressed the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves, causing neurally mediated syncope, hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysarthria. A concentration of 5 KE/2 ml of OK-432 was injected.
In this article we present a case study carried out with a student with dysarthria in the English language classroom.