dysaesthesia


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dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
3. Abnormal sensations experienced in the absence of stimulation.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
dysaesthesia and/or allodynia apparent during innocuous stimulation of the scalp and/or hair 2.
(20) Chronic pain is experienced by 20 percent to 50 percent of people with MS and may present as paraesthesia, dysaesthesia (burning, throbbing or shooting), hyperaesthesia so that non-painful touch becomes painful, and/ or anaesthesia.
It was demonstrated that corticosteroid therapy is a likely candidate for MM and multiple cranial neuropathies (26,27), and favorable improvement may be seen in painful dysaesthesia of painful sensory neuropathy and radiculoneuropathy forms with IVIg therapy (27,28,29,30).
Mr Atkinson now suf-f fers with numbness and dysaesthesia - an unpleasant pins-and-needles, crawling or burning sensation when touched - in his wrist, palm and left ring finger.
One patient had a post-operative complication with transient dysaesthesia in the distribution of the ulnar nerve that lasted for six weeks.
Implant success was evaluated based on the clinical and radiologic criterias13,14 that included: absence of mobility; absence of persistent subjective complaints (pain, foreign body sensation and/or dysaesthesia); absence of a continuous radiolucency around the implant; and marginal bone level changes in the first year implant insertion less than 1-1.5mm and the ongoing annual bone loss less than 0.2mm.
Sensory disturbance may include numbness, paraesthesia (pins and needles) or dysaesthesia (unpleasant burning pain and hypersensitivity).
Examination can also show features of allodynia (pain caused by a stimulus that does not normally cause pain), hyperalgesia (pain of abnormal severity in response to a stimulus that normally produces pain), hyperpathia (painful reaction to a repetitive stimulus associated with increased threshold to pain), dysaesthesia (unpleasant abnormal sensation as numbness, pins and needles or burning), paraesthesia (abnormal sensation which is not unpleasant) or evoke electric shock like pains.
Esch, the infamous nineteenth-century physician Samuel Cartwright promulgated such beliefs, diagnosing enslaved Africans with pseudoscientific ailments such as "drapetomania, or 'absconding from service' to seek freedom, and dysaesthesia Aethiopica, an illness whose 'diagnostic' was an inefficient, seemingly 'half-asleep' performance on the job and destruction of the master's property." Such diagnoses "pathologized resistance, transforming it into disease," ironically justifying strategies for race management that drove enslaved bodies to extremes (58, 59).
* Dysaesthesia: Unpleasant sensation, not always painful; when patients have a difficult time describing their pain symptoms and may often say, "It just feels weird ...
SSc patients' problems include, first of all, articular pain, mobility limitation caused by dysaesthesia and fingertip ulceration, Reynaud's symptom, systemic complications.
Between 37% (4) and 81%5 of parturients experience paraesthesia or dysaesthesia at the moment of dural puncture during 'needle through needle' insertion of 26 and 27 gauge pencil-point spinal needles, following the use of either air or saline (4) or an air-saline combination5 to determine loss of resistance and facilitate placement of the epidural needle.