dynamogenic

dy·na·mo·gen·ic

(dī'nă-mō-jen'ik),
Producing power or force, especially nervous or muscular power or activity.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dy·na·mo·gen·ic

(dī'nă-mō-jen'ik)
Producing power or force, especially nervous or muscular power or activity.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dynamogenic

(dī″nă-mō-jĕn′ĭk) [″ + gennan, to produce]
Pert. to or caused by an increase of energy.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Triplett, "The Dynamogenic Factors in Pacemaking and Competition".
Freely drawing on Durkheim and Mauss, Acephale sought "to harness the dynamogenic force of the Durkheimian sacred" (279).
As James says in The Varieties of Religious Experience, religion, as opposed to morality, is an "absolute addition" to life (20) It's a "sthenic" feeling, "an excitement of the cheerful, expansive, "dynamogenic" order which, like any tonic, freshens our vital powers." (21) Religion is a "flood and waterspout," he says in the same work.