dwarf

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dwarf

 [dworf]
an abnormally undersized person; see also dwarfism. adj., adj dwar´�fish.
hypophysial dwarf pituitary dwarf.
hypothyroid dwarf a dwarf with hypothyroidism or cretinism. See dwarfism.
infantile dwarf a dwarf with infantilism.
normal dwarf an individual who is undersized but perfectly formed.
pituitary dwarf a person with pituitary dwarfism; called also hypophyseal dwarf.
renal dwarf a person with renal dwarfism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dwarf

(dwōrf), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the body parts. See: dwarfism.
[A.S. dweorh]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dwarf

(dwôrf)
n. pl. dwarfs or dwarves (dwôrvz)
a. A person with a usually genetic disorder resulting in atypically short stature and often disproportionate limbs.
b. An atypically small animal or plant.

dwarf′ish adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A preferred term for a person of diminutive size resulting from dwarfism or of various causes
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dwarf

(dwōrf)
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the bodily parts.
See: dwarfism
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dwarf

(dwōrf)
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the body parts.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Slightly closer to home, at least in our own galaxy, another study also published in Nature looks at a single red dwarf star in a way that is a step forward in astronomers' search for life beyond Earth.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers have published findings about a supernova observed using TESS, adding new insights to long-held theories about the elements left behind after a white dwarf star explodes into a supernova.
They then analyzed data on the white dwarf stars' colors and luminosities.
One of the primary outcomes of the new research highlighted that the planets surrounding red dwarf stars may have exceptionally similar characteristics to planets orbiting solar system stars.
The IAC researcher and first author of the paper Jonay Gonzalez Hernandez added, "We have conducted an exhaustive exploration of the area around where the explosion of the supernova of 1006 occurred and have found nothing, which invites us to think that this event was probably the result of a collision and merger of two white dwarf stars of similar mass".
All these solutions involve a white dwarf star that somehow increases in mass to the highest limit.
Pont says he's optimistic that the search for planets that eclipse dwarf stars will soon identify one with the right stuff--the proper composition and temperature for life.
We know, for instance, that one of the stars in the binary system - the one that will eventually explode - must be a carbon-oxygen rich white dwarf star, the remnant of the main sequence star much like the sun.
In the biggest survey to date of the chemical composition of the atmospheres of white dwarf stars, the researchers found that the most frequently occurring elements in the dust around these four white dwarfs were oxygen, magnesium, iron and silicon - the four elements that make up roughly 93 per cent of the Earth.
So, says Lissauer, "while it is likely that some of the hundreds of billions of M dwarf stars in our galaxy have planets with temperatures, masses, and compositions similar to Earth's, the number of such planets is probably small, and Sun-like stars, despite being considerably less numerous, may well be the hosts of far more habitable planets."
Dwarf stars are the most common type of star in the galaxy, and the discovery suggests new places to search for life, Udry says.
Sand clarified, however, that the observations do not mean supernovae cannot be formed in binary systems of two white dwarf stars. Instead, he said the goal of such studies was to determine which of the two scenarios was more common in the universe.