dural sinus


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Related to dural sinus: venous sinus

dural sinus

Any of several large endothelia-lined collecting channels into which veins of the brain and inner skull empty and which then empty into the internal jugular vein. These venous sinuses are found between the two layers (periosteal and meningeal) of the dura mater. Their walls have no muscle, and they have no valves to give direction to the blood flow. The venous sinuses in the skull include the superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and cavernous sinuses.
Synonym: cerebral sinus; dural venous sinus
See also: sinus
References in periodicals archive ?
Transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb can normally show asymmetric signal intensity and enhancement and is more frequent on left due to compressive effect of left brachiocephalic vein during respiratory cycle.21 Arachnoid granulations are normal structures that protrude into the dural sinus lumen or lateral lacunae.
Barinagarrementeria, "Prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis," Stroke, vol.
Non-parenchymal CNS involvement mainly presents with intracranial hypertension due to dural sinus thrombosis.
Intracranial venous and dural sinus thrombosis due to protein S deficiency in a patient with AIDS.
This condition is also referred to as cortical venous, cerebral sinus, cerebral venous sinus, or dural sinus thrombosis.
ONSF has also been performed in cases of sight threatening papilledema secondary to dural sinus thrombosis or intracranial mass.
We report a rare case of NPSLE with coexistence of dural sinus thrombosis and intracerebral hemorrhage that had an inadequate response to high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide but responded dramatically to anticoagulation.
referred to AG as "giant" when they fill the lumen of a dural sinus, causing local dilatation or filling defects [1].
Ferro et al., stated that their multicentre prospective series study on cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis was the start of gaining reliable evidence on demographical features and prognostic factors of patients with CVST.1 In the current study records of patients with various neurological problems who had presented to the emergency department (ED) and were diagnosed with CVST and were evaluated by using different parameters such as distribution of age and gender, time between onset and presentation, clinical findings, predisposing factors, MPV and PDW values, neuroimaging findings and their treatment regime were reviewed.
The differential diagnosis for extra-axial masses on CT is the following: acute subdural hematoma; epidural hematoma; foreign body; meningioma; meningeal metastases; dural sinus thrombosis; cortical venous thrombosis; neurosarcoidosis; lymphoma; tuberculosis; dural A-V fistula; and rarely, extramedullary hematopoiesis; leukemia; venous varix; hemangiopericytoma; and malignant tumor.
No intracranial extension was seen, but the MRI did identify a thrombosis in the adjacent transverse dural sinus that extended to the sigmoid sinus and internal jugular vein (figure 2 A).
Use of mechanical thrombolysis via microballoon percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for the treatment of acute dural sinus thrombosis: Case presentation and technical report.