ductal carcinoma


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Related to ductal carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma in situ

duct car·ci·no·ma

, ductal carcinoma
a carcinoma derived from epithelium of ducts, for example, in the breast or pancreas.

ductal carcinoma

Infiltrating duct carcinoma, infiltrating carcinoma–not otherwise specified Oncology The major pathologic form of breast CA, which accounts for 50-75% of all invasive breast CAs Pathology To be defined as DC, 90% of tissue examined must have a ductal pattern; grossly, DC is indurated with a stellate pattern of extension; DC imparts an unripe pear sensation when cut with a fresh scalpel. See Axillary dissection, Estrogen receptors. Cf Lobular carcinoma, Medullary carcinoma.

Ductal carcinoma

A type of cancer that accounts for as much as 80% of breast cancers. These tumors feel bigger than they look on ultrasound or mammogram.
Mentioned in: Breast Ultrasound
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: breast cancer, lobes, lobules, ducts, ductal carcinoma in situ, ductal carcinoma, dcis, invasive
Prior to mammography's acceptance as a preventive screening tool, diagnoses of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were relatively rare, comprising approximately 3% of all breast cancers found.
Many cases of ductal carcinoma could be treated similarly, she says.
(4-7) Notably, those stains do not distinguish between ADH and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) because both entities show an absence of staining for high-molecular-weight cytokeratins.
Distinguishing breast atypia from ductal carcinoma in situ is important clinically but very challenging for pathologists.
Dr Joann Elmore, lead author of the study in the Jama Network Open journal, said: "Distinguishing breast atypia from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is important clinically but very challenging for pathologists."
Summing less than 1% among malignant epithelial pancreatic proliferations [7], the tumor has origin in the pancreatic ductal epithelium and a similar genic signature with ductal carcinoma [8], but very different morphology and variable prognosis [9, 10].
The advent of mammographic screening led to a dramatic increase in the incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), but that has not been paralleled by a decrease in invasive carcinoma.
DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) very rarely shortens your life.
And the only patients with positive lymph nodes had microinvasive tumors that were associated with relatively large non-invasive tumors (ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS).
Clara Nan-hi Lee, M.D., M.P.P., from The Ohio State University in Columbus, and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort survey study involving adult women undergoing mastectomy for stage 1, 2, or 3 invasive ductal or lobular breast cancer; ductal carcinoma in situ; or prophylaxis.
F P Invasive ductal carcinoma (2001) [15] F P Infiltrating ductal carcinoma F P Invasive ductal carcinoma F A Invasive ductal carcinoma F A Invasive ductal carcinoma F A Invasive ductal carcinoma F A Invasive ductal carcinoma F A Invasive ductal carcinoma F C Invasive ductal carcinoma F C Intraductal carcinoma Garcia et al.