dualism

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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
While the ordinary ego-I stands dualistically opposed to the world, to
Lewis also treats the theme of free will versus compulsion dualistically. As the nature of the process of their initiations suggest, Mark and Jane remain in their respective camps for different reasons, Jane because she chooses to do so and Mark because he is compelled to.
Here Twomey argues that the new but now commonplace reading of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight--that Gawain lacks spirituality or true faith--fails to recognize the role of the body in late Medieval Catholicism where the body and soul are not described dualistically. Twomey argues that Sir Gawain and the Green Knight "reflects the conventional somatic piety characteristic of mainstream Catholicism at the time the poem was written" (76).
In sum, the book displays how thoroughly our dualistically oriented culture's scientific investigation of human behavior is held in the grip of ancient traditional constructs that are imposed on observed events.
Floyd-Wilson and Sullivan are smart to address the predominance of dichotomies from the get-go; they are even optimistic about it: "we acknowledge the conceptual utility of thinking dualistically about body and environment.
Thus, mind and matter are not seen as dualistically separate but intimately interweaved in what can be considered a dual-aspect continuum of causal relatedness.
God's creation of male and female is thereby understood allegorically, and the "two countenances" explain man as dualistically passive and active, receptive and creative, reflecting his experience of God as transcendent and immanent.
Even unrealized compassion is not sullied by the body, speech and mind; Not seen dualistically, it is free of the stains of the three.
When we ground identities and alliances in dualistically defined categories, we establish and police boundaries--boundaries that shut us in with those whom we have defined as "like" "us" and boundaries that close us off from those whom we define as different.
The narrator claims that we know ourselves dualistically, as subject and object.
Emotion is opposed to reason, life is opposed to intellection, just as in Bergson heterogeneous succession was initially dualistically contrasted with homogeneous extension (Essai) and then later shown to envelop it as time envelops space (MM).