dualism


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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, austere dualism often seems like a straw dog.
In short, Cartesian dualism is inconsistent with the spiritual connectivity demanded of religion, and thus makes religion inconsistent with empirical and mathematical science.
Because something as basic as interpretation could significantly impact peacekeeping operations, the resolution of the dualism of close/distant relationships between local interpreters and their military units must be achieved.
After presenting an understanding of demesne agriculture, Cerman explores agrarian dualism and second serfdom as well as a host of key historiographic issues related to the region and period, including the origin and nature of the demesne economy and the question of economic backwardness (extensive versus intensive cultivation and peasant living standards).
Corbett's multi-layered argumentation, paraphrased simply, is first that Dante's dualistic tendencies were not merely a stage during the writing of the Monarchia and Convivio, but rather that the Commedia, like the prose works, contains inherent dualism. Secondly, that a dualistic Commedia needed a dualistic Epicurus, in order, not only to render intact Dante's political imperial ideals in the narrative but also to usher in a suitable space for the concomitant existence of his philosophical and spiritual beliefs.
Richards's throwaway remark 'Of course, this is Cartesian dualism' (67) and her casual reference to 'Szasz's notion of a Cartesian dualistic split' (70) are not ill-argued.
Alexander Rehding considers dualism as resulting from a dialectic in the manner of Hauptmann.
Taliaferro's interactive dualism is then presented as a more holistic form of dualism than that of Descartes.
In this episode of “Why Shamanism Now?” titled “Complementary Dualism in All Things,” Pratt and Webb explore complementary dualism as a sophisticated and practical philosophical model for living a balanced life, for healing, and for transformation.
Rodriguez-Pereyra points out that Descartes maintains "substance dualism" (no substance has both mental and material properties).
Very quickly we move from "ego" (Latin for 'T') to "egotistical," from "self' to "selfishness," from "dirt" to "dirty." Lurking below all this talk and consequent action lies what I call "extreme dualism," which can be popularly summarized in a mantra: "body bad, spirit superior." I do not claim that this extreme dualism exists uniformly in all religions, but I see it nevertheless as widespread and not totally limited to my Christian religion--where it runs rampant.
questions well-trodden interpretations that have tended to essentialize Eastern philosophy as monistic and Christian theology as intractable in its dualism. Third, Mechthild and Lalleswari's employment of vivid metaphors, especially their use of language denoting fluidity, provides R.