dual diagnosis


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The simultaneous presence of two mental health related conditions—e.g., a developmental and a mental disorder, learning disability and substance abuse, depression and substance abuse, etc.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dual diagnosis

Neurology A diagnosis of an emotional disorder and a developmental delay, drug and alcohol use or a mental illness in the same person
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dual diagnosis

The presence of mental illness in a patient with a history of concurrent substance abuse.
See also: diagnosis
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Dual diagnosis, https:// www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/ j Related-Conditions/Dual-Diagnosis.
Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services.
Cheng and Lo reported that older teens and boys are more likely to receive a dual diagnosis, but girls, with a dual diagnosis, are more likely to be institutionalized than boys are.
The characteristics of the 15 participants with dual diagnosis (33.3%) were as follows: 7 participants were presented with depression, 1 participant was presented with Obsession Compulsive Disorder and 4 participants were presented with Personality Disorder and all were Cypriots (71.1% of the sample).
Similar association was found for patients with psychiatric illness only (adjusted OR 0.82, 95 percent CI 0.78-0.85, p < .001), with substance use disorders only (adjusted OR = 0.79, 95 percent CI 0.66 0.94, p = .009), or with dual diagnosis (adjusted OR = 0.72, 95 percent CI 0.61 0.85,p < .001).
The three dichotomous (yes-no) variables we used to represent need for mental health services or substance abuse treatment were (1) dual diagnosis, (2) substance use disorder alone, and (3) mental disorder alone.
This article, a case study of the State of Victoria, Australia, examines the implications for the AOD sector of the emergence of dual diagnosis discourse and its role in service system improvement.
For the purposes of this study, only adolescents who presented with a dual diagnosis, defined as the presence of a psychotic disorder with a co-morbid SUD (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision 2000 (DSM-IV-TR) (12)), were included.
That was similar to the rate of cancer or dysplasia that occurred 8-10 years after dual diagnosis (20.4 cases per 100 person-years of follow-up, including 6.8 occurrences of cancer).
He talked about dual diagnosis, management within a psychosocial context psychosis with Coexisting substance misuse.