hamadryad

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hamadryad

(hăm′ə-drī′əd)
n. pl. hamadry·ads or hamadry·ades (-ə-dēz′)
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Dryad reports that it's not expecting to see the level of maritime crime fall in this region for the remainder of the year unless there's significant investment by local maritime forces in proactively countering this crime.
In the course of the research we noticed following pathogens on English oaks which are unusual for them: tinder fungus Fomes fomentarius, dryad's club saddle Polyporus squamosus, dyer's polypore Phaeolus schweinitzii.
Given its faerian beauty, we might be tempted to start with Lorien, whose mallorn trees with silver bark and gold leaves and white blossoms seem obvious candidates, and whose presiding spirit Galadriel could easily pass for a dryad as the term is conventionally understood.
| On Sunday morning, the sixth Hepworth Dryad Race was held.
The authors credit Public Library of Science (PLOS) with providing "a rich array of metrics on every article published" since 2009 and paving the way for a wide range of research outputs, such as Dryad, Figshare, and SlideShare, as well as services including Altmetric, ImpactStory, and Plum Analytics, which provide "a more complete picture of the impact of their research."
Not simply just a queen, she is in fact a dryad, a tree spirit that has taken human form and flees when confronted by the Chancellor.
But there is still a chance for behind the scenes involvement as a steward or a 'Narnian dryad' guiding people through the experience, and there are also spaces available for local talent to perform in the entrance lobby to entertain those waiting to go through the wardrobe.
1 No-ball; 2 Asthma; 3 Anglo-Saxon; 4 Curriculum vitae; 5 Many; 6 Lifeboat; 7 Skewer; 11 Aesop; 13 Penny Black; 14 Dryad; 16 Fetching; 18 Laurel; 20 Lesson; 21 Eloped; 22 Abet.
The intelligence hub has been set up by analysts Dryad Maritime in Portsmouth, Hampshire, southern England, to manage an international response to the threat of pirates which is costing shipping companies millions of pounds each year.
"Sarabande" follows the story of the titular character as she copes with calls from beyond the grave from her dead sister Dryad, as she travels the American west and Midwest to find the truth behind her voices, to either return her sister to life, or to take her place in the beyond.
Anne-Marie Mai's interpretation of "The Dryad" shows how Andersen's story refers to the Paris World Exhibition of 1867 where Andersen felt out of place and estranged.
In "Seeking Wisdom in the Clouds," Rob Farber, a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, discusses how solutions like Hadoop, the Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and Dryad are now making cloud computing accessible to all.