dry socket


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socket

 [sok´et]
a hollow into which a corresponding part fits.
dry socket a condition sometimes occurring after tooth extraction, particularly after traumatic extraction, resulting in a dry appearance of the exposed bone in the socket, due to disintegration or loss of the blood clot. It is basically a focal osteomyelitis without suppuration and is accompanied by severe pain (alveolalgia) and foul odor. Called also alveolar osteitis.

al·ve·o·al·gi·a

(al'vē-ō-al'jē-ă),
A postoperative complication of tooth extraction in which the blood clot in the socket disintegrates, resulting in focal osteomyelitis and severe pain.
[alveolus + G. algos, pain]

dry socket

n.
A painful inflamed condition at the site of extraction of a tooth that occurs when a blood clot fails to form properly or is dislodged.

dry socket

an inflamed condition of a tooth socket (alveolus) after a tooth extraction. The socket is not actually dry but is filled with a degenerating, infective blood clot. Normally a blood clot forms over the alveolar bone at the base of the socket after an extraction. If the clot fails to form properly or becomes dislodged, bone tissue and nerve endings are exposed to the oral environment and can become infected, a usually painful condition. Analgesics, applied topical sedatives, and drainage are required, in addition to treatment with local or systemic antibiotic therapy to cure the infection. See also alveolitis.
A complication in 1–2% of all tooth extractions, most commonly in molar teeth; the wounds consist of focal osteomyelitis, in which the clot in the socket disintegrates prematurely and becomes a nidus for oral bacteria. Dry socket responds poorly to therapy; it must therefore be aggressively prevented, and local or systemic antibiotics given at the time of extraction

dry socket

Alveolar osteitis Odontology A complication in 1-2% of all tooth extractions, most commonly in molar teeth; the wounds consist of focal osteomyelitis, in which the clot in the socket disintegrates prematurely and becomes a nidus for oral bacteria Clinical Severe pain and foul odor without purulence; DS responds poorly to therapy; it must therefore be aggressively prevented, and local or systemic antibiotics at the time of extraction

al·ve·o·al·gi·a

(al-vē'ō-al'jē-ă)
A postoperative complication of tooth extraction in which the blood clot in the socket disintegrates, resulting in focal osteomyelitis and severe pain.
Synonym(s): alveolalgia, dry socket.
[alveolus + G. algos, pain]

dry socket

Inflammation of the soft tissues of a tooth socket, occurring two or three days after extraction of a tooth, usually a lower molar. The condition is painful and may persist for days or weeks. The attention of a dentist is required.

Dry socket

A painful condition following tooth extraction in which a blood clot does not properly fill the empty socket. Dry socket leaves the underlying bone exposed to air and food.

al·ve·o·al·gi·a

(al-vē'ō-al'jē-ă)
A postoperative complication of tooth extraction in which the blood clot in the socket disintegrates, resulting in focal osteomyelitis and severe pain.
Synonym(s): alveolalgia, alveolar osteitis, dry socket.
[alveolus + G. algos, pain]

dry socket,

n See socket, dry and osteitis.

socket

a hollow into which a corresponding part fits.

dry socket
alveolar osteitis.
tooth socket
References in periodicals archive ?
Jorge and Bauer (1996) showed that in the dry socket suppuration does not take place, and exposed bony tissue of grayish coloration, sensibility to the instrumentation and fetid scent are observed.
Several modalities of treatment have been applied for a dry socket.
Poor said dry sockets occur in five to ten percent of all tooth extraction patients and have been reported as high as up to 65 percent of patients with lower third molar extractions.
Because post extraction sutures are not necessary and the chances of developing dry socket are so diminished, patient comfort is markedly enhanced.
Only three skin patches were engaged, directly, but he felt as though every square inch of his flesh--even the dry sockets under his arms, the damp pouch that tightly clamped his balls--caught the same agonizing sting, as from thousands of poison needles piercing his body's rind, at once (so this is it, now I'm halfway to hell, what's next?