dry gangrene


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dry gan·grene

a form of gangrene in which the involved part is dry, sharply demarcated, and shriveled; usually due to slowly occlusive vascular disease.
Synonym(s): cold gangrene, mummification (1)

dry gangrene

n.
Gangrene that is characterized by shriveling of the tissues in the absence of bacterial infection, usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood supply to the affected area.

dry gangrene

A condition caused by chronic vascular occlusion that slowly progresses to severe tissue atrophy and mummification, often associated with peripheral vascular disease–eg, DM, ASHD. See Gangrene.

dry gan·grene

(drī gang'grēn)
A form of gangrene in which the afflicted part is dry and shriveled.
Synonym(s): mummification (1) .

dry gangrene

GANGRENE developing as a result of loss of blood supply from arterial obstruction in which infection has not occurred. The tissues shrivel, mummify and the gangrenous extremity may drop off.

dry gan·grene

(drī gang'grēn)
A form of gangrene in which the involved part is dry and shriveled.
Synonym(s): mummification (1) .
References in periodicals archive ?
Dry gangrene is an irreversible process; the ischemic tissues will lead to thrombus formation and thus extension of gangrene.
Pyonecrotic lesions of the foot tissues (III-IV grades) were found in all 42 patients (Table 1), wet and dry gangrene being registered in two thirds and one third of the patients, respectively.
We report this case because a rare cause for reversible peripheral dry gangrene in the pediatric population was diagnosed.
The multi-center study will be randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled and will include only CLI patients with existing tissue loss (e.g., ulcerations and/or dry gangrene).
She underwent a left formal above-knee amputation for the dry gangrene. Unfortunately, she died of a pulmonary embolus postoperatively.
This can lead to a condition known as dry gangrene, where tissue deprived of blood flow dies.
They are; "grade O" = no open wound, "grade I" = a superficial ulcer without penetration to lower levels, "grade III" = lesion that penetrates deeper than grade II and there is an abscess, osteomyelitis, pyarthrosis, plantar space abscess, or infection of the tendon and tendon sheaths, "grade IV" = wet or dry gangrene in toes or forefoot, and "grade V" = gangrene involving the whole or portion of the foot that no local procedures are possible and amputation is indicated.