dry cough

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cough

 [kof]
1. a sudden noisy expulsion of air from the lungs; called also tussis.
2. to produce such an expulsion of air.
dry cough cough without expectoration.
productive cough cough attended with expectoration of material from the bronchi.
reflex cough a cough due to the irritation of some remote organ.
wet cough productive cough.
whooping cough see whooping cough.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dry cough

(drī kawf)
A cough not accompanied by expectoration; a nonproductive cough.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
'If it's a dry cough and not productive, no phlegm, you're not short of breath and have no fever, it's OK to wait a bit to see if it resolves,' she said.
Damascus, (SANA) -- In a statement issued on Sunday, the Ministry of Health advised citizens to take precautionary measures against flu since this disease tends to spread during this time of year.The statement advised people to keep away from crowded places, keep sitting areas well-aired, use single-use tissues when sneezing, washing hands with soap and water repeatedly, and avoid unhealthy habits such as hugging and kissing, particularly among children.The ministry urged sick citizens to see a doctor if they feel any usual symptoms such as a temperature above 38 degrees, dry coughs, sore throat, headache, chills, vomiting, diarrhea and muscle aches, since these symptoms may be a sign of swine flu which is now considered a seasonal flu.H.
These microbes can cause respiratory problems such as tiredness, dry coughs and in some cases can lead to lung problems.
Dry coughs are also called tickly coughs where no phlegm or mucus is produced; a chesty cough is the result of your body producing too much phlegm or mucus.
THE CLAIM: A new soother for sore throats, dry coughs. It contains an extract of marshmallow called mucilage which loosens and helps eliminate phlegm.
The researchers looked at 15 trials of the various types of cough medicine -from 'antitussives' to treat dry coughs to 'expectorants' for chesty coughs with phlegm -and came to the conclusion that the pounds 100 million or so spent on over-the-counter cough medicines in the UK every year may be 'an unnecessary expense'.
Victims of Sars suffer raging temperatures, dry coughs and breathing difficulties.
People who get flu can suffer from fever and headaches, aching limbs and weak muscles, sore throats, runny noses and dry coughs.
menthol and eucalyptus, Vic or Karvol for catarrh, sinusitis and dry coughs Preparations to help replace lost fluids after vomiting or diarrhoea Preparations for minor stomach upsets Soothing throat lozenges A thermometer A selection of plasters, non-absorbent cotton wool, elastic bandages and assorted dressings Safety pins, tweezers and sharp scissors.
If you're coughing up phlegm, avoid medicines designed for dry coughs. See your GP if it lasts for more than three weeks.
For dry coughs there are a variety of suppressants available, but you have to be careful as some may have side-effects such as drowsiness and a dry mouth.
Cough medicines come in two main types: expectorants, which are meant to help you cough up phlegm (chesty coughs), and suppressants, which are designed to interfere with the natural coughing reflex (dry coughs).