drug-seeking behavior


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drug-seeking behavior

Medtalk Any activity–eg, visiting the ER with spurious complaints of pain, claiming allergy to other agents–especially, analgesics–with the same effect, which are not the sought agent; DSB is almost invariably focused on obtaining prescriptions to addictive controlled substances–eg, oxycodone.
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) Furthermore, the release of glutamate in brain regions responsible for mediating drug-seeking behaviors was reported to cause relapse to cocaine-seeking behaviors, and the release of glutamate is critical in the relapse to METH and other drugseeking behaviors.
[sup][5] Furthermore, a series of studies to explore neural correlates of rewarding effects and drug-seeking behavior induced by MA and morphine focused on the interaction between the dopaminergic and opioidergic systems.
The physician suspected drug-seeking behavior and sent the patient home with anti-cramping medication and Tylenol.
In a way, CPP reflects drug-seeking behavior in animals and the psychological craving in humans [33].
Furthermore, drug abusers often invest significant time in seeking drugs, particularly illicit drugs--hence, drug-seeking behavior. In view of the time and response cost spent in procuring illicit drugs, much has been written concerning the behavioral economics of drugs as commodities (e.g., Bickel, Yi, Mueller, Jones, & Christensen, 2010).
Doctors should take a detailed and careful drug history, especially in those patients exhibiting drug-seeking behavior. Another caveat is to avoid all online prescriptions, in particular for controlled substances.
Animal studies of stress-induced drug use, neurobiology of stress and drug addiction, stress hormones in tolerance and withdrawal states, effects of stress on drug craving, stress induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior and relapse, and stress induced cognitive impairment are some other topics covered in this chapter.
Additionally, professionals should suspect drug-seeking behavior in their patients who demonstrate any of the behaviors listed in Table 1 (DEA 1999).
Indeed, there are many ways a patient can be difficult, including exhibiting habitual hostility, chronic drug-seeking behavior, or consistent noncompliance; breaking appointments at the last minute; or being a no-show.
The circuitry mediating cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. J Neurosci 21(21): 8655-8663.