drug-seeking behavior


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drug-seeking behavior (DSB)

a pattern of seeking narcotic pain medication or tranquilizers with forged prescriptions, false identification, repeated requests for replacement of "lost" drugs or prescriptions, complaints of severe pain without an organic basis, and abusive or threatening behavior manifested when denied drugs.

drug-seeking behavior

Medtalk Any activity–eg, visiting the ER with spurious complaints of pain, claiming allergy to other agents–especially, analgesics–with the same effect, which are not the sought agent; DSB is almost invariably focused on obtaining prescriptions to addictive controlled substances–eg, oxycodone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The result was decreased drug-seeking behavior in the vaccinated rats.
sup][5] Furthermore, a series of studies to explore neural correlates of rewarding effects and drug-seeking behavior induced by MA and morphine focused on the interaction between the dopaminergic and opioidergic systems.
The physician suspected drug-seeking behavior and sent the patient home with anti-cramping medication and Tylenol.
This gives us a possible mechanism for how drug use fuels further drug-seeking behavior, said principal investigator Linda Wilbrecht, PhD, a Gallo investigator now at UC Berkeley, but who led the research while she was on the UCSF faculty.
3) Discussions in response to drug-seeking behavior, of course, should always be delivered--and documented--by the physician.
The circuitry mediating cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior.
Removing the dependence category should help clinicians better differentiate between compulsive drug-seeking behavior, and the normal responses of tolerance and withdrawal when using prescribed medications, according to members of the DSM-5 Task Force.
Erickson delineates the severity of drug problems by outlining similarities and differences between drug abuse, drug dependence, and drug-seeking behavior.
Research with cocaine and rodents suggests that dopamine released in the dorsal striatum is associated with drug-seeking behavior.
Due to lack of cognitive component of attitude such individuals form a favorable attitude towards intoxication as a significant factor reinforcing drug-seeking behavior.
The most likely justification the physicians might give for adhering to this treatment regimen would be (1) they have not ruled out addiction or drug-seeking behavior as the "true" basis for the patient's complaints of pain, or (2) the risks and side effects of stronger opioids outweigh the benefits of pain relief.