drug-resistant

drug-resistant

1. Unaffected by chemotherapy.
2. Unable to be killed or eradicated with antibiotics, said of certain bacteria. Synonym: pharmacoresistant; drug-fast
References in periodicals archive ?
Complicating the issue, there is no official international recognition that totally drug-resistant tuberculosis exists.
HEALTH chiefs have told how the deadly drug-resistant strain of Tuberculosis which has claimed three lives in India could strike in the Midlands.
According to Hans Kluge, a special representative on drug-resistant tuberculosis in the WHO'S European region, "This problem is a man-made phenomenon resulting from inadequate treatment or poor airborne infection control.
In industrialized countries, outbreaks of drug-resistant TB (multidrug-resistant [MDR] and extensively drug-resistant [XDR] TB) have occurred predominantly among male patients (1).
(2) There are few data on drug-resistant TB from SSA, (3) probably owing to poor TB programme performance, inadequate laboratory facilities for drug susceptibility testing (DST), and poor surveillance, data collection and reporting procedures.
The number of drug-resistant cases went from 206 in 2000 to 389 cases in 2009.
Those without a drug-resistant strain need a six month course of multiple antibiotics, but those with multi-drug resistant TB may need to be treated for 18 months or longer.
Recent state-wide surveillance of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the state of Gujarat has shown resistance to flouroquinolones (FQ) in 24 per cent cases (19% among new and 25% among previously treated TB cases) (1).
"The drug-resistant isolates became the ones that survived all over the world.
Drug-resistant tuberculosis killed about 150,000 people in 2008, and half of all the world's cases are thought in be in China and India, the World Health Organization said in a report last week.
Two people with compromised immune systems who became ill with 2009 H1N1 influenza developed drug-resistant strains of virus after less than two weeks on therapy, report doctors from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
The discovery of antibiotics in distillers' grains has raised concern that ethanol plants could breed and disperse drug-resistant bacteria, and that those bugs could share their genes with bacterial species that cause human diseases.