drug

(redirected from drug toxicity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to drug toxicity: Drug allergy

drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
References in periodicals archive ?
Role of cytochrome P450 polymorphisms in the development of pulmonary drug toxicity: A case-control study in the Netherlands.
Coupled with IBN's expertise in nephrotoxicology that was recently published in Kidney International, (2013) DOI: 10.1038/ki.2012.442, the Institute can now facilitate drug toxicity testing for both the liver and the kidney, offering an inexpensive alternative to animal testing.
"It could one day provide insights into treating illnesses now considered incurable, and aid in the screening process for drug discovery and drug toxicity testing.
The Fa2N-4 cell line has also been engineered to function as a proxy for normal human liver cells for use in performing drug toxicity assays.
However, differences remain in a few areas." These include on combination drug toxicity testing, paediatric studies, repeated dose toxicity studies and others.
However, in an important number of patients the origin of liver enzyme elevation is not explained by an underlying liver disease or toxin and may occur either due to antiretroviral drug toxicity or the HIV infection itself.
Following a brief introduction to drug toxicity as systemic effects that may occur with overdosage of a medication, accumulation of the drug in the body over time, or the inability of a patient's body to eliminate the drug, international scientists present recent research trends in this field.
As such, environmental health researchers interested in understanding the pathogenesis of environmental disease, in defining mechanisms of environmental and drug toxicity, in classifying susceptible versus nonsusceptible individuals, and in predicting toxicity outcomes, must decipher the code.
But going from mouse to man was tar from simple or obvious because of the thinking that drug toxicity and drug resistance would be too problematic.
These results challenge the accepted belief that pacemaker implantation is unnecessary in these patients because AV block caused by drug toxicity is unlikely to recur.
If this were a drug toxicity, we would generally expect it to get worse over time, not get worse for a year and then stabilize.
Patients will be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of drug toxicity.