drug

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drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
References in periodicals archive ?
Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for ten macrolide drug residues in animal muscles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.
Another available trace detection technology is one that uses a "wipe and spray" method to detect drug residue. A suspected item is wiped with specially treated paper, then sprayed with an aerosol can.
The lack of bio-security measures, prevalence of diseases in poultry flocks, indiscriminate use of drugs without observing withdrawal period, drug residues especially sulfonamides retained in poultry meat and eggs may create hazards to human health in the country.
DrugWipes have limitations: They're single-use devices, and while the basic model is inexpensive (less than $10 per unit), each picks up only one specific type of drug residue. Even with a relatively low per-unit price, the cost of sweeping a school or a parking lot can mount quickly.
The Ionscan can also be adjusted to test for 60 types of drug residue.
In its findings the Soil Association, which promotes organic farming, claims drug residue levels are in fact higher than Government figures suggest.
The product is a spray that detects drug residue on flat surfaces.
As the blood nourishes the hair follicles, trace amounts of drug residue become entrapped in the core of the hair shaft.
Even so, the agency adheres to a strict safety margin in its drug residue testing, according to Hubbert in Washington, D.C.
According to a report in 2010, two US researchers found that the cause of the unprecedented decline in the population of vultures in India was a veterinary drug residue in cattle and livestock carcasses, which was killing most of the South Asian vultures, leaving them on the brink of extinction.
It would appear that the sensitivity of NGRC drug residue tests has increased manyfold and drug residues are now detectable for more than one or two weeks.
Specifically, he said, "All slaughter cattle marketed through or to Equity must be accompanied by a signed producer certificate, which indicates that to the best of the producer's knowledge, the cattle have not been fed any feed containing protein derived from mammalian tissues - meat or bone meal - and that none of the cattle have an illegal level of drug residue."

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