drug

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drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
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References in periodicals archive ?
His past history was unremarkable and he had no drug hypersensitivity. On physical examination, he appeared to be in good health and his vital signs were stable (blood pressure=125/75 mmHg, pulse=76 per minute, respiratory rate=18 per minute, pulse oxygen saturation=98%).
Class-related, serious and common adverse effects of frequently used antiretrovirals Class AEs Serious AEs Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) Tenofovir Hyperlactataemia and Renal failure, (TDF) lactic acidosis, with Fanconi's syndrome hepatic steatosis Lamivudine Lipodystrophic changes (3TC) and emtricitabine (FTC) Zidovudine Anaemia, leuco-or (AZT) neutropenia Abacavir (ABC) Drug hypersensitivity reaction Stavudine(d4T) Didanosine Pancreatitis (ddI) Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) Efavirenz Drug hypersensitivity Rare (0.2%) but severe (EFV) rash(NVP 24%, EFV 18% ); neuro-psychiatric Stevens-Johnson effects (depression, syndrome(NVP 0.3%, EFV delusions).
This work presents the latest research from around the world on biopharmaceutics and drug hypersensitivity, with nine chapters in all.
Biofortuna and Edinburgh-based Lab901 last November announced they will collaborate on the development of an automated diagnostic system for the detection of celiac disease and other HLA-related diseases such as reactive arthritis, diabetes, and drug hypersensitivity.
Currently, the most widely available tests are to confirm a Type I drug hypersensitivity by measuring drug-specific IgE.
VIENNA -- The triad of high fever, rash, and organ involvement occurring in a patient who has recently begun a new drug treatment may signal drug hypersensitivity syndrome, Dr.
Because Epzicom contains Ziagen, all the precautions about drug hypersensitivity reactions to Ziagen must be followed.
Immune-mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions (IDHR) Workshop: Mechanisms to Increase IDHRT Research Opportunities.
Sinusitis, allergies, and drug hypersensitivity are among the conditions associated with IC, which seems to have an allergic component.