drug


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drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
References in periodicals archive ?
My own experience suggests that whether a drug paralyzes or activates you has as much to do with where you start emotionally as with the drug itself.
Worst of all, when you take a drug that isn't prescribed to you in a way you're not supposed to--by increasing dosages, mixing medications with alcohol or other drugs, or snorting them or injecting them into your bloodstream--you can overdose and put your life at risk.
These tests follow the protocol in the European Technical Guidance Document to further investigate the risk posed by the drug to the environment.
It doesn't mean we won't stop monitoring the drug to see its effect on the black community."
Condition branding was soon being used by other drug makers to sell everything from high-cholesterol medications to Viagra.
When Volkow and her colleagues looked at the brains of 10 obese people, the team found a dopamine-receptor deficiency identical to that in drug addicts.
Researchers have shown that LTP is involved in how both drug exposure and stress affect the brain.
As it happens, existing government negotiating practices with healthcare providers and drug makers are not the fabulous models suggested by advocates.
Monitoring the proper use of the medications: Because of their coordinated patient-care model, specialty pharmacies can work directly with the physician to ensure the drug is appropriate for treatment and the medication is prescribed at the proper dosage level.
Much of the information about adverse consequences identified by both teens and our expert panelists was not drug specific.
"They bury their heads in the sand and don't even entertain the thought of a faculty drug testing program," says Hovland.
Taken together, data obtained from the Taiwan Surveillance of Drug Resistance in Tuberculosis and those reported previously show that rates of combined resistance to any drugs and multiple drugs has declined in Taiwan.