drop foot

foot·drop

(fut'drop),
Partial or total inability to dorsiflex the foot, as a consequence of which the toes drag on the ground during walking unless a steppage gait is used; most often ultimately due to weakness of the dorsiflexor muscles of the foot (especially the tibialis anterior), but has many causes, including disorders of the peripheral and central nervous systems, motor unit, tendons, and bones.

drop foot

See FOOT DROP.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paralytic drop foot and gluteal fibrosis after intramuscular injections.
Synovial cyst is asymptomatic of the first one of these three cases and it is sometimes symptomatic in the second case and it resulted in hypoesthesia in foot lateral and drop foot in the third case like our case.
Collins suffers from a "drop foot" as a result of a back operation which causes him difficulty walking.
DAMAGE "Phil suffers from 'drop foot' as a result of a back operation, which makes it difficult to walk.
Collins, 66, reportedly missed a step and fell on his way to the bathroom of his room due to a condition known as "drop foot," which he has following an emergency back surgery he received back in 2015, (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/news/phil-collins-postpones-shows-rushed-hospital/) The Telegraph reports.
Herein, we report a case of postherpetic paresis and drop foot as an unusual complication in whom late clinical signs suggested previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus.
When I developed drop foot, I wore an ankle-foot orthosis for 15 years.
A 69-year-old female presented with a chief compliant of right lower lateral leg aching with a drop foot. She had been experiencing pain for over 5 weeks and did not have a history of trauma.
I would strongly recommend you not try to manage drop foot yourself.
[5] Bourrel, Bourges and Tourze (1967) reported twenty-three cases of drop foot (18 caused by leprosy), in which they had done dual transfer of the tendons of the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus.