drop attack


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drop at·tack

1. sudden fall without precipitant or associated symptoms or signs, generally in old people with normal electroencephalograms; of unknown cause;
2. atonic seizure.

drop attack

a form of transient ischemic attack in which a brief interruption of cerebral blood flow causes a person to fall to the floor without losing consciousness. The fall may be caused by a disrupted sense of balance or decreased leg muscle tone. Weakness of the leg muscles or a hip or knee joint dysfunction may be a contributing factor.
An episodic and precipitous loss of motor function, in which the victim is either standing or walking, and abruptly plummets, fully conscious to the floor, as the legs give way
Aetiology Idiopathic—most common in older women and attributed to age-related defects in reflexes; drop attacks also occur in vertibrobasilar ischaemia, acute labyrinthine vertigo, cataplexy, and ‘plateau waves’, and may be associated with loss of consciousness in syncope and seizures

drop attack

Neurology An episodic and precipitous loss of motor function, where the victim is either standing or walking, and abruptly plummets, fully conscious to the floor, as the legs give way; idiopathic DAs are most common in older ♀, and attributed to age-related defects in reflexes; DAs may also occur in vertibrobasilar ischemia, acute labyrinthine vertigo, cataplexy, 'plateau waves'; DAs with loss of consciousness occur in syncope and seizures

drop at·tack

(drop ă-tak')
An episode of sudden falling that occurs during standing or walking, without warning and without loss of consciousness. The patients are usually elderly and have normal findings on electroencephalograms.

drop attack

A tendency to fall suddenly, without warning, and without loss of consciousness. Drop attacks may be due to a temporary shortage of blood to the brain and should be investigated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease and the reported association of drop attacks with neck hyperextension and with abnormalities of the brain stem, vertebrobasilar insufficiency is generally considered to be a common cause of true drop attacks in the elderly.
While it is certainly possible that the patient's drop attacks ceased spontaneously, both she and I are convinced that nifedipine played a major role in the resolution of this problem.
She underwent the procedure and her drop attacks stopped but she began to exhibit partial or focal seizures, with her head turning to the right, speech arrest and staring.
Drop attacks are a primary cause of injury in patients with LGS.
Drop attacks are frequent in LGS and responsible for most injuries associated with falls.
Then complex seizures and drop attacks stopped occurring.
Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, which typically begins between 1 and 6 years of age, has mixed seizures, including convulsions, myoclonic seizures in which muscles jerk uncontrollably, and drop attacks (atonic seizures) where the child suddenly falls forward with force.